Dr Luca Paci has a PhD in Philosophy and works as a poet, translator and lecturer. Among his works the translation of La Ragazza Carla  by Elio Pagliarani,  essays on Benedetto Croce,  Carmelo Bene, and Cesare Pavese.  In English he published The Fine Line with poet Juergen Gebrsezgabiher, the video poem London Trip-tych with Luke Heeley and took part on Poets on Pasolini for the BFI. He has organized a number of poetry and literary events in London and Italy. He is currently teaching at Swansea University.

Dr Paci is artistic director with Dr Luisa Percopo of the Italian Film Festival Cardiff. This year's event will take place from November 22 to 26. For more details click here.

Areas of Expertise

  • Contemporary Italian Literature and Poetry
  • Classical and Contemporary Italian Cinema
  • Modern and Contemporary Italian Philosophy

Publications

  1. History Subsumed: Objectivity and Historiography in Croce’s Early work. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 21(2)
  2. (2006). A Girl Named Carla.
  3. (Eds.). La narrativa italiana degli anni Sessanta e Settanta. Naples: Dante & Descartes.

Teaching

  • ML-102 Modern European Film: Themes and Perspectives

    This module explores themes of metamorphoses and adaptation in six contemporary European films. Each film depicts transformative human experiences, significant events that can be seen as rites of passage in various stages of people's lives. The module also introduces methods by which such experiences are represented through the medium of film. The films selected for this module are in French, German, Italian, and Spanish, and are all subtitled.

  • ML-M25 Gender in Contemporary European Culture

    This module provides an introduction to the representation of gender in contemporary European culture through in-depth analysis of groundbreaking, sometimes controversial, novels, plays and films. It pays close attention to the nexus of gender and sexuality, ethnicity, work, the media, history, scandal, desire and politics. All texts will be read in translation.

  • MLI100A Introduction to Italian Culture (A)

    This module provides all students of Italian with an insight into important historical and cultural developments in Italy since national unification in 1859-60, focussing chiefly on the period up to the end of the Second World War. It also examines examples of Italian writing (studied in English translation parallel with the Italian text) and film against the historical background in which they were produced. The module provides students with the skills and foundation knowledge which they need to pursue other academic modules in Italian in more detail.

  • MLI100B Introduction to Italian Culture (B)

    This module provides all students of Italian with an insight into the main historical and cultural developments in Italy since national unification in 1859-60, focussing chiefly on the period since the Second World War. It also examines examples of Italian writing (studied in English translation parallel with the Italian text) and film against the historical background in which they were produced. The module provides students with the skills and foundation knowledge which they need to pursue other academic modules in Italian in more detail.

  • MLI204 Postmodern Italian literature: Calvino, Eco and Fo

    This module is designed as an introduction to postmodern writing in contemporary Italian literature through the works of Italo Calvino, Umberto Eco and Dario Fo who are arguably the most popular writers of twentieth century Italy. Their works enjoy a vast audience throughout Europe and the rest of the world. The module discusses Calvino, Eco and Fo¿s challenge to traditional notions of literature, culture, history and translation using three seminal texts, Invisible Cities, The Name of the Rose and Accidental Death of An Anarchist.

  • MLI210 Translation Workshop (Italian/English)

    Seminars will discuss a series of four simulated translation projects dealing with different text types, from the point of view of the requirements of the participants (eg commissioning agency, client, target-language readership), and comparative analysis of relevant areas of Italian and English language and culture. Students write up for assessment the second project (after discussion in class), and the fourth (independently, after receiving feedback on the second).

  • MLI304 Postmodern Italian literature: Calvino, Eco and Fo

    This module is designed as an introduction to postmodern writing in contemporary Italian literature through the works of Italo Calvino, Umberto Eco and Dario Fo who are arguably the most popular writers of twentieth century Italy. Their works enjoy a vast audience throughout Europe and the rest of the world. The module discusses Calvino, Eco and Fo¿s challenge to traditional notions of literature, culture, history and translation using three seminal texts, Invisible Cities, The Name of the Rose and Accidental Death of An Anarchist.

  • MLI310A Translation Workshop (Italian/English)

    Seminars will discuss a series of four simulated translation projects dealing with different text types, from the point of view of the requirements of the participants (eg commissioning agency, client, target-language readership) and comparative analysis of relevant areas of Italian and English language and culture. Assessment is based on two additional projects not previously discussed in class, but detailed feedback on the first will be provided before the second (to be submitted at the end of the module) is undertaken

  • MLT328 Translation Theory and Ethics Through the Ages

    Throughout history and all over the world, translation has played a vital role in mediating between languages and cultures. The translator's role has often been a delicate one, at the point of intersection between conflicting religious, political, cultural and social value-systems, and translators up to the present day have always had to negotiate, more or less successfully, the resultant ethical dilemmas. This module combines historical and theoretical perspectives on Translation Studies, focusing them on the ethical issues raised, in many different contexts, by the practice of translation. Such issues include the mediation of religiously-sensitive content, the strengthening of vernacular cultures, and the transmission of scientific and cultural knowledge, as well as the translator's position in relation to gender bias, post-colonial values, or the claimed 'dehumanizing' effects of contemporary computerized translation tools. The module aims to explore the continuing relevance of such historical and theoretical issues to translators working today.