Professor John Morgan
Professor Emeritus (Arts & Humanities)
College of Arts and Humanities
Telephone: (01792) 602586

Teaching

  • CLC204 The Roman Comic Novel: Excrement and Sacrament

    This module studies, through English translations, the two surviving Roman comic novels, the `Satyrica¿ of Petronius, and the `Metamorphoses¿ (`The Golden Ass¿) of Apuleius. These ostensibly bawdy and comic texts are in fact works of great literary sophistication, and invite reading at several different levels. The lectures will concentrate on close reading and interpretation, but also set the novels in a variety of contexts: historical, cultural, religious and philosophical. The generic identity of the `Satyrica¿, its connection with other literary genres, and its relevance to the Neronian period will be explored; Federico Fellini's film of the `Satyrica¿ will be shown and discussed. In connection with Apuleius' novel, students will also read some relevant Platonic philosophy (especially the myth of the soul in `Phaidros¿), and learn something about the mystery religions of the Roman Empire, of which Apuleius was a devotee and of which his novel seems to be in part an allegory.

  • CLC304 The Roman Comic Novel: Excrement and Sacrament

    This module studies, through English translations, the two surviving Roman comic novels, the `Satyrica¿ of Petronius, and the `Metamorphoses¿ (`The Golden Ass¿) of Apuleius. These ostensibly bawdy and comic texts are in fact works of great literary sophistication, and invite reading at several different levels. The lectures will concentrate on close reading and interpretation, but also set the novels in a variety of contexts: historical, cultural, religious and philosophical. The generic identity of the `Satyrica¿, its connection with other literary genres, and its relevance to the Neronian period will be explored; Federico Fellini's film of the `Satyrica¿ will be shown and discussed. In connection with Apuleius' novel, students will also read some relevant Platonic philosophy (especially the myth of the soul in `Phaidros¿), and learn something about the mystery religions of the Roman Empire, of which Apuleius was a devotee and of which his novel seems to be in part an allegory.