I am interested in all aspects of translation and interpreting, particularly translation technologies, translation theory, technical and specialised translation, computer-assisted translation, but I am also interested in many aspects of linguistics (especially formulaic language) as well as in the teaching of Spanish in Higher Education. One of my more recent interests is the introduction of technology into teaching in Higher Education.

Areas of Expertise

  • Computer-Assisted Translation
  • Translation Theory
  • Translation and Interpreting
  • Language Technology
  • Technical Translation
  • Translation Studies
  • Corpus Linguistics
  • Spanish Language Teaching

Publications

  1. & Recounting and reflecting: The use of first person pronouns in Chinese, Greek and British students' assignments in engineering. Journal of English for Academic Purposes 26, 66-77.
  2. & Investigating the Relationship between Vocabulary Size and Cultural Competence in English-Arabic Translation. Athens Journal of Philology
  3. Integrating Computer-Assisted Translation Tools into Language Learning. In New Perspectives on Teaching and Working with Languages in the Digital Era. (pp. 385-396). Research-Publishing.net.
  4. & Transparency of Nominal Compounds in Medical English: Problems in their Translation into Spanish and Slovak. In Pius ten Hacken, Renata Panocova (Ed.), Word Formation and Transparency in Medical English. (pp. 97-132). Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars.
  5. Formulaicity in the English-Spanish Translation of Specialized Texts. In Anna Bączkowska (Ed.), Perspectives on Translation. (pp. 29-49). Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars.

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Teaching

  • ML-S01 Translation projects A

    This module is for students who can only complete TB2 abroad. The module consists of two translation projects. Students with two language pairs are encouraged to use one in each project. Students with one language pair who can work in both directions are encouraged to do one project in each direction. Each translation project involves a translation of 5,000-6,000 words. In addition to the translation, students will be asked to write a commentary of 2,500-3,000 words which gives an overview of the translation problems encountered and the strategies applied in order to solve them. For each of the two translation projects, students will be assigned a supervisor, depending on the language combination. The source text is determined by the supervisor, but students may negotiate the domain and propose a text. Students will then need to decide who the translation is for (the ¿skopos¿). This will determine a number of translation decisions. In a series of meetings with the supervisor, students will discuss translation problems, get feedback on parts of the translation and obtain advice on how to set up a commentary.

  • ML-S02 Translation Projects B

    This module is for students who can only complete TB1 abroad. The module consists of two translation projects. Students with two language pairs are encouraged to use one in each project. Students with one language pair who can work in both directions are encouraged to do one project in each direction. Each translation project involves a translation of 5,000-6,000 words. In addition to the translation, students will be asked to write a commentary of 2,500-3,000 words which gives an overview of the translation problems encountered and the strategies applied in order to solve them. For each of the two translation projects, students will be assigned a supervisor, depending on their language combination. The source text is determined by the supervisor, but students may negotiate the domain and propose a text. Students will then need to decide who the translation is for (the ¿skopos¿). This will determine a number of translation decisions. In a series of meetings with the supervisor, students will discuss translation problems, get feedback on parts of the translation and obtain advice on how to set up a commentary.

  • MLSM07 Intermediate Spanish for Postgraduate Students

    Professional translators typically need to be able to offer 2 languages pairs. Translation MA students who may have given up another language on leaving school can take this opportunity to pick it up again at Intermediate level and develop more advanced translation skills. This module combines the post A-Level first year General Language programme with, in the second semester, the corresponding Level 2 Translation Workshop (working into English). MA students join first and second year groups as appropriate, attending all classes and taking all assessments for the relevant modules. The final mark for the MA module is composed of the overall averages for the L1 General Language and L2 Translation Workshop modules, weighted 2:1. NB: this module involves 3 hours/week of classes in semester 1 and 4.5 hours/week in semester 2, and is only offered subject to satisfactory timetabling arrangements being available.

  • MLSX02 Universitat de Valencia

    This module gives you the opportunity to increase your language skills and get a sense of university study in the area of one of your languages of study in the BA Modern Languages.

  • MLT301B Translation Project (Sem 2)

    Professional translation involves much more than replacing expressions in one language by expression in another one. In this module, you will put into practice everything you have learned about the translation process in the course of your studies. Together with your supervisor you will agree on a text to be translated and you will be given a translation brief specifying the practical context of the translation. Depending on the subject, you might want to use computer tools and/or do some terminological research as part of your translation work. The assessment does not only consist of the translation you produce, but also takes into account your commentary. The commentary will describe the problems you encountered in the translation and your approach to these problems.

  • MLT318 Terminology Management

    Terminology management is one of the most time-consuming aspects of professional translation. Many dedicated tools have been developed to reduce the time translators have to spend on terminology. The proper use of these tools requires a good understanding of the theoretical background of terminology as well as some practice. In this module, we will consider different types of terms and the proper treatment of each of them. We will also work with some of the state-of-the-art termbase software.

  • MLT322 Dissertation for Translation Studies

    Translation is a wide-ranging field of study. Students in this module take one of their content modules as a basis for the exploration of a question of a restricted scope on which they write a 7,000-8,000 word dissertation. Base modules can be any of the compulsory, optional, or elective modules that are assessed by means of an essay or an essay-style exam. The research question is agreed with the supervisor, who is normally the coordinator or another teacher on the base module. The supervisor guides the student to a good structure for the dissertation and will recommend sources, but the student is expected to extract the necessary information and present it in a well-organized argument, leading to a convincing answer to the original question.

  • MLTM05 Foundations of Translation and Interpreting

    Studying translation involves a number of special skills. They include, for instance, making optimal use of monolingual and bilingual dictionaries, and writing a well-structured commentary explaining your translation strategy or your use of specialized software. There are also some general skills you need, such as setting up a bibliography for a particular topic and formatting your documents to a professional standard. Apart from these skills, this module will also give you some general introductory knowledge of, for instance, the difference between terms and words and the organization of Computer-Assisted Translation tools. Finally, this module will introduce you to basic linguistic concepts and terminology, which you can use in discussing your translation work.

  • MLTM11 Translation Technologies

    This module follows on from MLTM03, expanding the range of Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools which students will be trained to handle and further developing their generic IT skills with specific reference to translation tasks. The 10 two-hour guided computer classes held weekly through Semester 2 explore a range of software packages including Deja-Vu, Star Transit, SDL Passolo and Systran. Particular emphasis is placed on the exchange of translation data between different packages. The assignment for the module is a software comparison in which students will select and evaluate a CAT tool which has not been taught as part of the module, comparing it in detail to one that has. The individual report that they write will carry 100% of the marks.

  • MLTM17 Translation Work Experience for MA Students

    The first part of this module consists of a number of lectures by industry professionals presenting translation project workflow and organization of the translation business, project management software, and job application procedures. It is concluded with an application letter and a CV for a position in a translation agency. In the second part of the module, this fictitious translation agency will be operational. The texts to be translated are selected by lecturers who act as customers. In addition, translation agencies or international partners may act as customers. Translation agencies will use archived work. For each translation, the originator of the task fills in a customer satisfaction report, a brief summary overview of the extent to which the product satisfies professional standards.

  • MLTM18 Terminology Management

    Terminology management is one of the most time-consuming aspects of professional translation. Many dedicated tools have been developed to reduce the time translators have to spend on terminology. The proper use of these tools requires a good understanding of the theoretical background of terminology as well as some practice. In this module, we will consider different types of terms and the proper treatment of each of them. We will also work with some of the state-of-the-art tools for the description and extraction of terms in practical sessions in the computer lab, including SDL Trados MultiTerm and MultiTerm Extract.

Supervision

  • Culture-Bound Items between English and Arabic (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Lloyd Davies
  • Nominal Compounds in English and their Translations (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Rocio Perez-Tattam
  • An Evaluation of the Translation Programmes in the Saudi Arabian Universities. (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Andrew Rothwell
  • A comparative evaluation of the performance of Computer-Aided Translation (CAT) and Machine Translation (MT) tools in English-Arabic translation (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Andrew Rothwell

Administrative Responsibilities

  • Director of MA in Professional Translation

    2014 - Present

  • Associate Dean for Postgraduate Taught Masters

    2014 - Present

  • Chair of the COAH Year Abroad Sub-Committee

    2013 - Present

  • BA Translation Programme Director

    2013 - 2014

  • Exams Officer (Hispanic Studies)

    2012 - 2014

  • Exams Officer (Translation)

    2012 - Present

Research Groups

  • FLaRN – Formulaic Language Research Network

    The Formulaic Language Research Network (FLaRN) is a loose association of professional and student academic researchers. It is a tool for keeping a group of like-minded people from around the world in touch with each other, and has been the focal point for three postgraduate conferences. The network exists to co-ordinate research work in the field of formulaic language, to share ideas and resources, and to create a sense of community between researchers who are not necessarily in geographical proximity.

  • Language Research Centre (LRC)

    Swansea University