Dr Ersin Hussein
Lecturer
Classics, Ancient History & Egyptology
Room: Office - 119
First Floor
James Callaghan
Singleton Campus

I am an ancient historian and my research primarily focuses on local identity formation in the Hellenistic and Roman Mediterranean. My PhD studies investigated the culture and society of Roman Cyprus and was driven by study of the surviving material artefacts, notably inscriptions. I am currently in the final stages of revising this text which is under contract with Oxford University Press to be published as a monograph.

Upon completion of my PhD at Warwick University in 2015, I continued to develop my research on the phenomena of cross-cultural contact in the Roman Empire and on the materiality of ancient artefacts (their use, abuse, reuse and reception). My practice and outlook is interdisciplinary and my research on local identity formation, particularly in relation to ancient Cyprus and its landscape, has been developed most recently through an ongoing collaboration with the visual artist Yorgos Petrou. The most recent stages of our interdisciplinary research has been supported by the Cyprus High Commission (London). In November 2017 we hosted the art exhibition 33° 3’ 45’’ East (at the Cyprus High Commission from 23rd November to 2nd December) which presented our combined work to date on the themes of geological stratification and identity formation in Cyprus. This event drew specialist and non-specialist audiences and was featured as part of the online documentary series Κύπριοι του κόσμου.

I am currently developing research on metals and identity formation in antiquity (particularly on copper) and foresee the development of this into a long-term interdisciplinary project which explores the impact of metals on communities from antiquity to the present day.

Areas of Expertise

  • Roman Cyprus
  • Local identity formation in the Roman provinces
  • Mining, metallurgy, and identity in antiquity
  • The ancient economy
  • Greek and Latin epigraphy
  • The materiality of objects

Publications

  1. & A Musical Note from Roman Cyprus. Trends in Classics 8(1)

Teaching

  • CLH150 Rome from Village to Empire: An Introduction to Roman History

    This module provides an introduction to the full sweep of Roman history from the origins of the city (traditionally recorded as 753 BC) through its expansion and development as the centre of a world empire to the political and military eclipse of the western empire in the 5th century AD. Students will learn about the political and military institutions of (in particular) the Republican and Imperial periods of Roman history, the cultural, social and economic characteristics of those periods, and about Rome's relationships with its subjects and neighbours. While the core of the module consists of lectures providing a survey overview of over a millenium of Roman history, seminars will enable students to undertake in-depth case studies relating to particular periods, engaging with both contemporary written evidence (read in translation) and material and visual evidence.

  • CLH2004 Ancient Cyprus

    This module will explore the dynamic culture and society of Ancient Cyprus, with particular attention paid to its Roman period. Consideration of defining geographical features of the island and its location in the Mediterranean Sea will introduce the study of ancient Cyprus. Next, the module will provide an overview of the island¿s Prehistoric, Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic periods. Having `set the scene¿, the remaining teaching sessions will focus on the island¿s Roman period - the cultural history of which has been traditionally considered as obscure and uniform. While it has been thought that Cyprus pales in comparison to other well documented and urban concerns of Ancient Rome, it is an important case study for considering the themes of power, identity, and life in the Roman provinces in general because of its far-reaching economic connections and rich material culture. The approach of this module will be multi- and interdisciplinary with coins, art, inscriptions, architecture, literary sources, and archaeology being assessed.

  • CLH3004 Ancient Cyprus

    This module will explore the dynamic culture and society of Ancient Cyprus, with particular attention paid to its Roman period. Consideration of defining geographical features of the island and its location in the Mediterranean Sea will introduce the study of ancient Cyprus. Next, the module will provide an overview of the island¿s Prehistoric, Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic periods. Having `set the scene¿, the remaining teaching sessions will focus on the island¿s Roman period - the cultural history of which has been traditionally considered as obscure and uniform. While it has been thought that Cyprus pales in comparison to other well documented and urban concerns of Ancient Rome, it is an important case study for considering the themes of power, identity, and life in the Roman provinces in general because of its far-reaching economic connections and rich material culture. The approach of this module will be multi- and interdisciplinary with coins, art, inscriptions, architecture, literary sources, and archaeology being assessed.