Dr Krijn Peters

Dr Krijn Peters
Associate Professor
Political and Cultural Studies
Telephone: (01792) 295183

I joined the department in 2010 having been a lecturer at the Centre for Development Studies, Swansea University since 2005. I obtained my PhD at Wageningen University, the Netherlands, undertaking an investigation into armed conflict and post-war reintegration trajectories of youthful ex-combatants in Sierra Leone, West Africa. My BSc and MSc were in rural development sociology, again at Wageningen University, for which I undertook field work in Sierra Leone and Cambodia. In 2000 I worked a year for Save the Children UK evaluating their ex-child soldier reintegration project in Liberia. I have provided consultancy services for a number of international organisations, including the World Bank, Plan International, the Institute for Security Studies and the Dutch Royal Institute of the Tropics.

Publications

  1. Youth, Wars and Violence in West Africa’. History Compass 10(12), 879-888.
  2. War and the Crisis of Youth in Sierra Leone. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  3. Group Cohesion and Coercive Recruitment: child soldiers in Sierra Leone.. In Özerdem, A. & Podder, S (Ed.), Child Soldiers: From Recruitment to Reintegration. (pp. 389-415). Palgrave MacMillan.
  4. & “The Boys Are Coming to Town”: Youth, Armed Conflict & Urban Violence in Developing Countries. International Journal of Conflict and Violence 5(2), 277-291.
  5. & War and Children. Greenwood Publishing Group.

See more...

Teaching

  • HUA206 Contemporary Wars and Conflicts

    This module introduces and critically explores contemporary warfare and conflict, from post WWII up to the present War on Terror. It considers the de-colonization/independence wars; the Cold War proxy conflicts; post-1990 New Wars and the War on Terror.

  • HUA306 The Aftermaths of War

    A peace-accord is no guarantee for the absence of violence or armed conflict in the future. This module will look into the crucial post-war phase and discusses the major challenges that have to be tackled to consolidate the peace. The module is divided into three blocks; the first block starts with the cessation of the fighting, discussing how ceasefires and peace-accords are negotiated and how nations then deal with the disarmament and demobilisation of often large numbers of fighters. The second block will discuss the various challenges in rebuilding a post-war country, the reconstruction of its infrastructure (eg roads, schools, hospitals) as well as the rehabilitation of its soft infrastructure (educational and vocational training, government services, etc). The last block will look at how the state and its affected population will deal with the legacy of the war.

  • HUPM04 War, Identity and Society

    This module is the companion module to HUPM03. It takes a pluri-disciplinary approach to understanding the impacts of war on society and vice-versa. The module evaluates the ways in which conflict changes and reshapes society and analyses the problems of war, its representations and its social outcomes. 'War' in thus not viewed solely in terms of military history, but rather through a broader context of changing social, economic and cultural trends both as a motor for change and as part of those broader changes. The module is taught over a ten week period. The weekly two hour sessions include at least an hour of seminar style `teaching¿, to make sure that there is ample time for discussions, questions, student presentations, etc. Hence, it is expected of all students to read the compulsory reading for each session beforehand, so that meaningful discussions can take place. .

  • PO-395 Dissertation (PO-325)

    Subject to the approval of the Departmental Dissertations Tutor, students will choose their own area for research. They will be given guidance on research skills and techniques and supervised by a specialist research topic supervisor during the research for, and writing of, their dissertation. Dissertation word length - 8000 words.

  • PO-396 Researching Politics 1

    This module offers students a valuable experience of both individual and collective research as well as the opportunity to study in depth an important aspect of Politics and International Relations. After an introductory session students will work in small groups pursuing research into a specific topic using a wide variety of source materials under the guidance of a member of staff with appropriate specialist knowledge and expertise.

  • PO-397 Researching Politics 2 (PO-327)

    This module offers students a valuable experience of both individual and collective research - as well as the opportunity to study in depth an important aspect of Politics and International Relations. Students extend and deepen the research undertaken in PO-396 Researching Politics 1 and continue to meet regularly in order to share ideas, opinions and sources. In these meetings, students evaluate, criticise and analyse issues concerning the topic under investigation. Minutes of the meetings are kept and the meetings are conducted with a view to arriving at a common position that will serve as the basis for producing a collectively authored report and presentation. Each student in the group also produces a shorter individual report on their own experience of Researching Politics, in the course of which they reflect on their individual contribution to the groups output. This self-assessment is validated by the other members of the group.

  • PO-M25 Dissertation

    Individual research based, under the guidance of appointed supervisor.

  • PO-M32 Conceptual Issues In the Theory and Practice of Social Sciences

    This module introduces MA students to philosophical and methodological issues relating to the possibilities, purpose and conduct of the social sciences. These issues are of great importance for the development of thinking about how to study political theory, political science or international relations. The intellectual reflection demanded by this module will feed into students¿ approaches to their work in the sub-disciplinary modules and dissertation.

  • PO-M56 The State of Africa

    Africa is the world's second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. It is the cradle of human kind and gave birth to one of history¿s first large civilizations. But despite its early start and its abundant natural resources, Africa remains the world's poorest and most underdeveloped continent. This course will provide an overview of the continent¿s historical developments as well as more contemporary ones. The first block of lectures will give the student an appreciation of Africa¿s diverse and complex history and will make clear the extent to which the continent is already connected to both Europe and Asia for many centuries, if not millennia. The second block will look at some of Africa¿s biggest challenges. For many, Africa ¿ and in particular Sub-Saharan Africa - is synonymous to armed conflict, devastating famines, the spread of deadly diseases and viruses (notably HIV/AIDS and malaria) and shocking poverty. The final two sessions look into the contemporary issues of governance, globalisation and economic development.

  • PO-M63 Rights-based Approaches to Development

    Rights-based approaches to development (RBAD) are now part of a new orthodoxy with respect to policy and practice in support of international development. They have become popular in part because they provide a language for analysing poverty as a complex and multi-dimensional phenomena and for analysing governance as a process that responds directly to people¿s needs, entitlements and rights. They direct attention to aspects of poverty which have traditionally been neglected in development policy at national and international levels. This module examines the background to rights-based approaches to development. Particular attention will is paid to the four separate arenas in which RBADs are now evident: development practice, development discourse; the policy commitments of donors and governments; and the obligations imposed on donors and governments by international human rights law. The module examines the implications of rights-based approaches for development policy and practice in the context of two contradictory phenomena: a system of international relations based on the principle of state sovereignty and the complex phenomenon of `globalis ation¿. Issues that arise in relation to the rights of indigenous peoples and children will be used as ways of examining the situation of vulnerable groups.

  • PO-M64 Violence, Conflict and Development

    Violence and conflict have been enduring and widespread obstacles to the promotion of sustainable development throughout the latter half of the twentieth century, and the 21st century looks set to continue this pattern. This module examines the roots and causes of conflict and violence in developing nations and explores how and why such conflict emerge even between hitherto seemingly peacefully co-existing communities. The module asks what impact protracted and violent conflict can have upon development prospects and democratisation processes, and examines national and international responses to violence and conflict mediation processes and systems. The module also explores soome of the arguments surrounding the use of aid in conflict situations, and examines the extent to which development aid and emergency relief can assist in perpetuating a state of conflict.

Supervision

  • 'Media Representation of Conflict:Sudan national Media Representation of the Darfur Conflict.' (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Yan Wu
  • 'A Political Economy Analysis of the Agricultural Structure of the South-eastern Anatolia Region of Turkey.' (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Mr Robert Bideleux
  • 'Development, Gender Equality and Training for Women in Politics- A case study of Nigeria' (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Roland Axtmann
  • International Development Planning: the role of Social Analysis (SIA) A case of World Health Organisation Country Programme in Nigeria (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Gerard Clarke
  • Understanding Transitional Justice in Post Conflict Contexts: A Comparative study of traditional based approaches and transitional justice mechanisms towards Peace building and Reconciliation in Sierra Leone. (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Roland Axtmann
  • “From weapons to wheels: assessing the impact of track construction for motorbike taxis on rural youth in Liberia”. (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Gerard Clarke
  • 'Achieving Good Governance and Development in Nigeria through Decentralization.' (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Gerard Clarke
  • ''Post-Conflict Statebuilding as a Counterinsurgency Strategy: A Critical Analysis of Afghanistan'' (awarded 2016)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Roland Axtmann
  • '''Primary Education, Conflict and Policy Implications in the Gaza Strip''' (awarded 2014)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Gerard Clarke
  • 'Neo-Communitarianism and Speconomy as models for development in Sub-Saharan Africa.' (awarded 2013)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Mark Evans
    Other supervisor: Prof Roland Axtmann
  • Agency or Structure? Nigerian University Students' Perspectives of Influences on Sexual Risk Taking (awarded 2009)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Professor Neil Price