Dr. Martina Minas-Nerpel

About Me

I am a Reader in Egyptology at Swansea University. I earned my Magister Artium in Egyptology and Classical Archaeology at Trier University (Germany) and subsequently completed a Master of Philosophy (M. Phil.) research degree in Egyptology at Oxford University before returning to Trier University, first with a Lectureship, then with an Assistant Professorship (Hochschulassistentin) in Egyptology. At Trier University, I completed the Doctor of Philosophy (Dr. phil.) and the Habilitation (Dr. habil.) before moving to Swansea in autumn 2006. I was previously an Alexander von Humboldt-scholar at Oxford University and a visiting professor at Ain Shams University, Cairo. I serve on the Board of Trustees of the Egypt Exploration Society since December 2010.

Publications

  1. & ‘Raising the pole for Min in the temple of Isis at Shanhūr’. Zeitschrift für Ägyptische Sprache und Altertumskunde, 140, 150-166.
  2. Pebbles inscribed in demotic from a burial in the tomb of Padikem at Tuna el-Gebel. Enchoria: Zeitschrift für Demotistik und Koptologie, 33, 65-90.
  3. ‘Ptah-Pataikos, Harpokrates, and Khepri’. In in E. Frood and A. McDonald (eds.), Decorum and experience. Essays in ancient culture for John Baines (Oxford: Griffith Institute). (pp. 147-151). Oxford: Griffith Institute.
  4. Review of: Elizabeth Donnelly Carney: Arsinoë of Egypt and Macedon. A Royal Life. Oxford: Oxford University Press 2013, in: sehepunkte 13, no. 9 [15.09.2013], URL: http://www.sehepunkte.de/2013/09/23241.html. Sehepunkte, 13(9)
  5. Review of: Elizabeth Wickett, Seers, Saints and Sinners: The Oral Tradition of Upper Egypt. I.B. Tauris. ISBN 978 1 780 76053 7. In: Ancient Narrative 11, 1–7.. Ancient Narrative, 11

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Teaching

  • CL-M30 Understanding Ancient Egyptian Culture

    This module will introduce students to selected key theories, methodologies and approaches currently used to further the study of ancient Egyptian culture. Case- studies will be presented based on the expertise of the staff and may vary.

  • CL-M36 Egyptology Dissertation

    Dissertation module for the MA in Ancient Egyptian Culture.

  • CL-M66 Reading Advanced Egyptian Texts

    The module builds upon the student's ability in the Egyptian language and is dedicated to the in-depth study, translation, criticism, and interpretation of one or more Egyptian texts in the original. Depending in the needs and interests of the students, the texts selected will be drawn from Old, Middle, or Late Egyptian; Demotic; or Coptic.

  • CL-M73 Middle Egyptian Language 1 for MA Students

    The module introduces the student to the writing system of ancient Egypt and the language of hieroglyphic texts.

  • CL-M74 Middle Egyptian Language 2 for MA Students

    The module introduces the student to the writing system of ancient Egypt and the language of hieroglyphic texts. It builds on the knowledge and skills acquired in Middle Egyptian Language 1 for MA students and takes the student on to a better understanding of Egyptian grammar and culture.

  • CLD300 Classics, Ancient History, Egyptology Dissertation

    Dissertation module for students doing single honours or joint honours degrees in Classics, Classical Civilisation, Ancient History or Egyptology. The aim is for students to do detailed research, to work on a project for several months and to produce a scholarly study of c. 8000-10000 words. The dissertation topic can be chosen freely, in consultation with a member of academic staff and subject to compatibility with a student's degree scheme and availablilty of supervisors and library material.This is a chance for students to pursue an area in which they are especially interested, and to deal with it in depth. Students may choose to do museum-based research. There are two preparatory pieces of assessment: an abstract, outline and bibliography, and an analysis of crucial source material and/or secondary literature. Work on the dissertation itself takes up most of the two semesters. Students are expected to do research independently, but there is a series of lectures in the first semester to provide advice on research and scholarly writing, Every student will be assigned a supervisor who will be organising group sessions with his/her supervisees and who will also be available for one-to-one supervision sessions.

  • CLE112 Egyptian Language 1

    This module introduces the grammar of the Middle Egyptian language in the hieroglyphic script.

  • CLE113 Egyptian Language 2

    This module continues the formal study of Classical Egyptian grammar in the hieroglyphic script.

  • CLE121 Introduction to Ancient Egyptian History and Cvilisation 2

    This module provides an overview of Egyptian history and civilisation from the beginning of Dynasty 19 until the Graeco-Roman Period (circa 1290 BCE-395 CE). It provides an essential foundation of knowledge for students pursuing an Egyptology degree scheme as well as an introduction to an ancient civilisation for nonspecialists.

  • CLE221 Egyptian Language 3

    This module continues the study the grammar of the Middle Egyptian language in the hieroglyphic script.

  • CLE225 Egyptian Language 1

    This module introduces the grammar of the Middle Egyptian language in the hieroglyphic script.

  • CLE325 Egyptian Language 3 for Level 3 Students

    This module continues the study the grammar of the Middle Egyptian language in the hieroglyphic script.

  • CLE334 Alexandria. Multicultural Metropolis of the Ancient World

    In 331 BC, shortly after Alexander’s conquest of Egypt, Alexandria was founded. In the next decade or so it replaced Memphis as the new the capital of the Ptolemaic kingdom of Egypt. It soon dominated the eastern Mediterranean world politically, culturally, and economically for more than six hundred years. Being predominantly a Greek city, it rapidly turned into the focal point of science, philosophy, and poetry in the Hellenistic and Roman world, a counter-weight both to ancient Egyptian culture and science and to other Greek centres of learning such as Athens. The module will examine how this remarkable and rapid success was accomplished. On the other hand, the Egyptians formed a great majority of the population, alongside the influential minority of Greeks and other foreign groups such as the Jews. The Egyptian influence on cult buildings, the royal quarters, the necropoleis, the statuary, etc. will be traced and discussed. This module examines in a cross-disciplinary approach the nature of a multicultural city and society as well as the impact of the Hellenistic and Roman contact with the native Egyptian culture. The module is thus of interest for students in Egyptology, Ancient History, and Classical Civilisation.

  • CLE342 Ancient Egyptian and Ptolemaic Queens

    This module examines the developing role of the queen of Egypt from the Old Kingdom to the Ptolemaic Period, with an emphasis on the queens of the New Kingdom, the God’s Wives, and the Ptolemaic Queens. Egyptian queenship was complementary to kingship, both in dynastic and Ptolemaic Egypt. The king and the queen functioned as the basic duality through which regeneration of the creative power of the kingship was accomplished. The queen was considered to be a manifestation of Hathor, the female prototype of creation. The royal mothers and wives played a fundamental role in the mythological renewal of kingship, but only in very rare cases, the queen could assume the power and surpass her traditional role as king’s wife, mother, sister, or daughter. On one hand, the module will explore the theoretical background of the kingship and queenship ideology; on the other hand, specific cases will be discussed, comprising queens like Hatshepsut, Nefertiti, Nefertari, Arsinoe II, and the various Cleopatras, including the most famous one, Cleopatra VII Philopator, and the God’s Wives of Amun. Written sources (in hieroglyphic Egyptian and Demotic, Greek, and Latin – in translation) as well as iconographic and archaeological evidence will be taken into account in order to understand the queens of Egypt in their political, historical, social, and cultic context.

Supervision

  • Diegetic Lists in the Pr.t-m-Hrw (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr. Kasia Szpakowska
  • 'Tomb Security in Ancient Egypt from the Predynastic to the Pyramid Age.' (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr. Troy Sagrillo
  • 'An Analysis and Interpretation of the Role of the Rekhyt-People Within the Egyptian temple.' (awarded 2014)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr. Kasia Szpakowska
    Other supervisor: Professor Thomas Schneider
  • 'Typology and Artisanship in twenty-Fifth Dynasty Theban Shabtis: The Chief Lector priest Pedamenope' (awarded 2013)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr. Troy Sagrillo
  • 'Maintaining the Status Quo: An Examination of Social Relations at Medinet Habu during the Reign of Ramesses XI as Expressed in the Late Ramesside Letters.' (awarded 2012)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr. Troy Sagrillo
    Other supervisor: Professor Thomas Schneider
  • An interpretation of the symbolism of the cone on the head of the male tomb owner in Ancient Egyptian New Kingdom mortuary art. (awarded 2008)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr. Kasia Szpakowska
    Other supervisor: Dr. Ellen Morris
    Other supervisor: Professor Thomas Schneider