Professor Martina Minas-Nerpel

Professor Martina Minas-Nerpel
Professor
Classics, Ancient History & Egyptology
Telephone: (01792) 295188

About Me

I am Professor of Egyptology at Swansea University. I earned my Magister Artium (M.A.) in Egyptology and Classical Archaeology at Trier University (Germany) and subsequently completed a Master of Philosophy (M. Phil.) research degree in Egyptology at Oxford University before returning to Trier University, first with a Lectureship, then with an Assistant Professorship (Hochschulassistentin) in Egyptology. At Trier University, I completed the Doctor of Philosophy (Dr. phil.) and the Habilitation (Dr. habil.) before moving to Swansea in autumn 2006. I was previously an Alexander von Humboldt-research scholar at Oxford University (2002) and a visiting professor at Ain Shams University, Cairo (2005). I served on the Board of Trustees of the Egypt Exploration Society for three years from December 2010 and am now a member of their Fieldwork and Research Committee. At Swansea University I serve as the Director of the Graduate Centre of the College of Arts and Humanities.

Publications

  1. & (Ed.). Ägyptische Königinnen vom Neuen Reich bis in die islamische Zeit. Beiträge zur Konferenz in der Kulturabteilung der Botschaft der Arabischen Republik Ägypten in Berlin am 19.01.2013.. Vaterstetten: Verlag Patrick Brose.
  2. ‘Arsinoe II. und Berenike II.: Frühptolemäische Königinnen im Spannungsfeld zweier Kulturen’.. In M. Eldamaty, F. Hoffmann, and M. Minas-Nerpel (Ed.), Ägyptische Königinnen vom Neuen Reich bis in die islamische Zeit. Beiträge zur Konferenz in der Kulturabteilung der Botschaft der Arabischen Republik Ägypten in Berlin am 19.01.2013.. (pp. 87-114). Vaterstetten/Germany: Verlag Patrick Brose.
  3. ‘Pharaoh and temple building in the fourth century BC’ (in press for 2016). In P. McKechnie (Ed.), Ptolemy I Soter and the transformation of Egypt 404–282 BC, international conference held at Macquarie University Sydney, 28–30 September 2011. Leiden: Brill.
  4. Ptolemaic queens in the Egyptian temple reliefs: Inter-cultural reflections of political authority, or religious imperatives?. In In P. Kousoulis and N. Lazaridis (eds.) Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress of Egyptologists, University of the Aegean, Rhodes, 22-29 May 2008. Orientalia Lovaniensia Analecta.. (pp. 809-821). Leuven/Belgium: Peeters.
  5. Creativity in visual arts (in press). In Vandorpe, K. (Ed.), Blackwell Companion to Greco-Roman and late antique Egypt (in press). Wiley-Blackwell.

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Teaching

  • CL-M30 Understanding Ancient Egyptian Culture

    This module will introduce students to selected key theories, methodologies and approaches currently used to further the study of ancient Egyptian culture. Case- studies will be presented based on the expertise of the staff and may vary.

  • CL-M36 Egyptology Dissertation

    Dissertation module for the MA in Ancient Egyptian Culture.

  • CL-M73 Beginning MIddle Egyptian1 (MA)

    The module introduces the student to the writing system of ancient Egypt and the language of hieroglyphic texts.

  • CL-M74 Beginning Middle Egyptian 2 (MA)

    The module introduces the student to the writing system of ancient Egypt and the language of hieroglyphic texts. It builds on the knowledge and skills acquired in Middle Egyptian Language 1 for MA students and takes the student on to a better understanding of Egyptian grammar and culture.

  • CLD300 Classics, Ancient History, Egyptology Dissertation

    Dissertation module for students doing single honours or joint honours degrees in Classics, Classical Civilisation, Ancient History or Egyptology. The aim is for students to do detailed research, to work on a project for several months and to produce a scholarly study of c. 8000-10000 words. The dissertation topic can be chosen freely, in consultation with a member of academic staff and subject to compatibility with a student's degree scheme and availablilty of supervisors and library material.This is a chance for students to pursue an area in which they are especially interested, and to deal with it in depth. Students may choose to do museum-based research. There are two preparatory pieces of assessment: an abstract, outline and bibliography, and an analysis of crucial source material and/or secondary literature. Work on the dissertation itself takes up most of the two semesters. Students are expected to do research independently, but there is a series of lectures in the first semester to provide advice on research and scholarly writing, Every student will be assigned a supervisor who will be organising group sessions with his/her supervisees and who will also be available for one-to-one supervision sessions.

  • CLE121 Introduction to Ancient Egyptian History and Civilisation 2

    This module provides an overview of Egyptian history and civilisation from the beginning of Dynasty 19 until the Graeco-Roman Period (circa 1290 BCE-395 CE). It provides an essential foundation of knowledge for students pursuing an Egyptology degree scheme as well as an introduction to an ancient civilisation for nonspecialists.

  • CLE333 Egyptian Language: Reading Advanced Texts

    This module builds upon the student's ability in the Egyptian language and is dedicated to the in-depth study, translation, criticism, interpretation of one or more Egyptian texts in the original. Depending on the needs and interests of the students, the texts selected will be drawn from Old, Middle or Late Egyptian; Demonic; or Coptic.

Supervision

  • An examination of the economic classification of donations to temples between the Twenty-first Dynasty and the Ptolemaic Period (1077-30 BC) (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Troy Sagrillo
  • Diegetic Lists and their Contextual Analysis in the Early ''Book of the Dead'' (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Kasia Szpakowska
  • Untitled (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Kasia Szpakowska
  • Untitled (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Kasia Szpakowska
  • 'Tomb Security in Ancient Egypt from the Predynastic to the Pyramid Age.' (awarded 2014)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Troy Sagrillo
  • 'An Analysis and Interpretation of the Role of the Rekhyt-People Within the Egyptian temple.' (awarded 2014)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Kasia Szpakowska
  • 'Typology and Artisanship in twenty-Fifth Dynasty Theban Shabtis: The Chief Lector priest Pedamenope' (awarded 2013)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Troy Sagrillo
  • 'Maintaining the Status Quo: An Examination of Social Relations at Medinet Habu during the Reign of Ramesses XI as Expressed in the Late Ramesside Letters.' (awarded 2012)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Troy Sagrillo
  • An interpretation of the symbolism of the cone on the head of the male tomb owner in Ancient Egyptian New Kingdom mortuary art. (awarded 2008)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Kasia Szpakowska