Dr Evelien Bracke

Dr Evelien Bracke
Senior Lecturer
Classics, Ancient History & Egyptology
Telephone: (01792) 602974

As an undergraduate student, I studied Literature & Linguistics: Latin & Greek at the University Ghent (Belgium). I did my PhD thesis at the National University of Ireland Maynooth, for which I examined the tension between metis and magic in the poetic representations of two major mythological figures, Medea and Circe. My research partly focuses on the concepts of cunning intelligence (metis) and magic in ancient Greek and Roman poetry and myth, with a focus on gender, narrative, and linguistics.

I have worked at Swansea University as language tutor of Latin and Greek since 2008 and am now also Employability and School Liaison Officer for our Department. I am the coordinator for Wales of the Iris Project’s Literacy through Latin project for which my students go to local schools and teach Classics (both culture and languages). To support this project, I hold Leverhulme funding to examine the impact of learning Latin on primary age pupils. 

I am the secretary of the South West Wales branch of the Classical Association; see their website (www.swwclassicalassociation.weebly.com) for more information.

Finally, I am also the secretary of KYKNOS, the Swansea and Lampeter Centre for Narratives of the Ancient World. See http://kyknos.swan.ac.uk.

Areas of Expertise

  • Ancient Greek myth
  • poetry
  • and linguistics
  • Teaching approaches to ancient languages at primary level and in deprived areas

Publications

  1. (2015). Learning Latin in Wales: report on research and practice. (n/a).
  2. The role of university student teachers in increasing Widening Participation to Classics. Journal of Widening Participation and Lifelong Learning 18(2), 111-129.
  3. Bringing Ancient Languages Into a Modern Classroom: Some Reflections. Journal of Classics Teaching 16(32), 35-39.
  4. & (Eds.). Epistolary Narratives in Ancient Greek Literature edited by O. Hodkinson, P. Rosenmeyer and E. Bracke. BRILL.
  5. Literacy through Latin in South Wales: MFL approaches to Latin teaching. Journal of Classics Teaching 28

Teaching

  • CL-M27 Greek Texts 2

    This is the second of two master¿s level modules dedicated to the in-depth study, translation, criticism and interpretation of a Greek text in the original.

  • CL-M29 Latin Texts 2

    This is the second of two master¿s level modules dedicated to the in-depth study, translation, criticism and interpretation of a relatively complex and sophisticated Latin text in the original. It is appropriate for students who have studied Latin for three years or more.

  • CL-M55A Postgraduate Further Greek 2

    Consolidation and extension of ancient Greek language skills for students who have successfully completed CL-M54 Postgraduate Further Greek 1. Study of one or more straightforward verse texts in the original language.

  • CL-M59A Postgraduate Further Latin 2

    Consolidation and extension of Latin language skills for students who have completed CL-M58 Postgraduate Further Latin 1. Study of one or more straightforward verse texts in the original language.

  • CL-M82 Magic in the Ancient World: Exploring the Sources

    This module explores the concept of Greek and Roman magic. Students will examine the various theories on magic and to what extent they might apply to the ancient context, learn to differentiate between the two main types of sources relating to ancient magic, and examine their contexts, complexities, and problematics. We will explore the socio-political contexts and ideologies which allowed for the concept to be formed and develop. Both archaeological and literary evidence will be discussed, and we will look in particular at issues of gender and rhetoric. Open to students of the MA schemes in Ancient History and Classical Culture, Ancient Narrative Literature, Classics, and Ancient Egyptian Culture. Also available as an elective module to suitably qualified students taking other degree schemes and visiting and exchange students. Previous knowledge of Greek and Latin language is not required.

  • CLC315 Classics in Popular Culture

    This module explores the ways in which modern popular culture has used and transformed perceptions of the ancient world, and offers students the opportunity to engage with the academic sub-discipline of Reception Studies. The module examines how and to what purposes ancient cultures, literatures, history, and myth are perceived and transmitted in popular culture. We will evaluate theoretical approaches and methods for analysis of both ancient and modern texts. While the module will focus on certain specific examples of Reception Studies, students will have the chance in coursework to create case studies of modern examples of their own choice (agreed by the module coordinator), both in blog posts and essay form. Module content may vary. Areas that will be explored include novels, films, music, graphic novels, theatre, and children's literature.

  • CLD300 Classics, Ancient History, Egyptology Dissertation

    Dissertation module for students doing single honours or joint honours degrees in Classics, Classical Civilisation, Ancient History or Egyptology. The aim is for students to do detailed research, to work on a project for several months and to produce a scholarly study of c. 8000-10000 words. The dissertation topic can be chosen freely, in consultation with a member of academic staff and subject to compatibility with a student's degree scheme and availablilty of supervisors and library material.This is a chance for students to pursue an area in which they are especially interested, and to deal with it in depth. Students may choose to do museum-based research. There are two preparatory pieces of assessment: an abstract, outline and bibliography, and an analysis of crucial source material and/or secondary literature. Work on the dissertation itself takes up most of the two semesters. Students are expected to do research independently, but there is a series of lectures in the first semester to provide advice on research and scholarly writing, Every student will be assigned a supervisor who will be organising group sessions with his/her supervisees and who will also be available for one-to-one supervision sessions.

  • CLG126 Further Greek 2 (Level 1)

    TBC

  • CLG226 Further Greek 2 (Level 2)

    Consolidation and extension of ancient Greek language skills for students who entered the University with a good GCSE (or equivalent) in ancient Greek and completed Intermediate Greek at Level 1. Study of one or more straightforward verse texts in the original language.

  • CLG228 Advanced Greek 2 (Level 2)

    Consolidation and extension of advanced ancient Greek language skills for students who have completed Further Greek at Level 1. Study of one or more straightforward relatively complex and sophisticated verse texts in the original language.

  • CLG328 Advanced Greek 2 (Level 3)

    Consolidation and extension of advanced ancient Greek language skills for students who have completed Further Greek at Level 2. Study of one or more straightforward relatively complex and sophisticated verse texts in the original language.

  • CLG330 Advanced Greek 4

    Consolidation and extension of advanced ancient Greek language skills for students who have completed Advanced Greek 1 and 2 at Level 2. Study of one or more relatively complex and sophisticated verse texts in the original language.

  • CLL126 Further Latin 2 (Level 1)

    Consolidation and extension of Latin language skills for students entering the University with an A level (or equivalent) in Latin. Study of one or more straightforward verse texts in the original language.

  • CLL226 Further Latin 2 (Level 2)

    Consolidation and extension of Latin language skills for students who completed Intermediate Latin at Level 1. Study of one or more straightforward verse texts in the original language.

  • CLL326 Further Latin 2 (Level 3)

    Consolidation and extension of Latin language skills for students who began the study of Latin at Level 1. Study of one or more straightforward verse texts in the original language.

  • CLL328 Advanced Latin 2 (Level 3)

    Consolidation and extension of advanced Latin language skills for students who have completed Further Latin at Level 2. Study of one or more relatively complex and sophisticated texts in the original language.

  • CLL330 Advanced Latin 4

    Consolidation and extension of advanced Latin language skills for students who have completed Advanced Latin at Level 2. Study of one or more relatively complex and sophisticated texts in the original language.

  • CLP200 Level 2 Project

    This module enables students to expand their knowledge of the Classical and/or ancient Egyptian world in an area of their own choice, and to experiment with a method of communicating that knowledge which is different from the usual assessment practices of essay-writing and exam-writing. They might undertake research that leads to (for example) the construction of a database, the reconstruction of some ancient Greco-Roman or Egyptian artefact, or the production of a storyboard, play script or dramatisation. They might acquire experience of a communication method which could be of use in a future career, e.g. by constructing a teaching plan, writing in a journalistic or creative style, or planning a museum exhibit. They might choose to experiment with a different medium of communication, e.g. video, website. The topic and form of the project chosen must both be approved by the module convener.

History and Classics Career Guidance

I’m the Departmental Employability Officer. This means I help students with aspects of finding a job: I organise workshops to develop or help you to become aware of your skills, and invite former graduates and people in exciting jobs to come and tell you about how they became successful.

I can help with the following: If you don’t know what you want to do; CV and personal statement development; Getting work experience during your degree to prepare for graduation;  Finding subject-specific jobs, funding, and training; Any questions related to jobs and skills for History, Classics, Ancient History, and Egyptology

I don’t know all the answers but can usually refer you to someone who can help if I can’t. (Naturally I can’t take any responsibility for whether or not you are successful in job or PGCE applications...)

For 2014-15 I have designed a series of workshops and talks. You can find information about these at Careers events  As you can see, not all the details are finalized, but you will be updated in due time.

I have made workshops specifically for certain levels or career paths, so you might only want to attend those you are interested in. However, keep in mind that you can always learn by listening to inspiring people, so don’t exclude speakers just because they’re not speaking about the career you want to pursue.

For more information take a look at  Places to look for subject specific jobs

Email (e.bracke@swansea.ac.uk) to ask for an appointment, even if you just want to have a chat about your options.