Goal 1 - No Poverty

No Poverty

 Pacondaa Creative Workshop

Promoting resilient aquaculture

Pacondaa and its role in reducing poverty

It is essential that aquaculture production be sustainably developed to ensure Global Food Security and Poverty Alleviation for all humankind, but disease outbreaks represent a key challenge to the aquaculture industry. Our consortium of nine research institutes and universities in India, the UK and Bangladesh will work with farmers in India and Bangladesh to identify existing best practices through the PACONDAA project (Poverty alleviation through prevention and future control of the two major socio-economically-important diseases in Asian aquaculture). Their experience will be used to formulate new guidelines to disseminate throughout farming communities across Asia.

With an aim to reduce poverty through sustainable aquaculture through the PACONDAA project, Swansea team (CO-PI: Dr Sergei Shubin, Research officer: Tanjil Sowgat) is engaging with the local communities in Bangladesh and India to understand poverty and to reduce it through promoting resilient aquaculture. Recent impact activities explored options for sustainable futures and co-developed poverty stories with young people, artists, academics and local people in rural India and Bangladesh. The activities already received an outstanding response in sharing knowledge and understanding of multidimensional poverty. The impact activities successfully encouraged new champions and volunteers among the artists, farmers and above all local children who want to ensure scientific and resilient aquaculture and find new ways to understand and reduce poverty. The research Swansea team is hopeful that this study will contribute to new and fresh approaches to the understanding of poverty and its reduction through aquaculture.

Contact details:

Dr Tanjil Sowgat (Department of Geography) tanjil.sowgat@swansea.ac.uk

Development of biological 'pesticides'

Biocontrol and natural products group (BANP)

Our research aims to develop sustainable, environmentally friendly products and strategies for the control of arthropod pests of global socio-economic importance.

Products include entomopathogenic fungi such as Metarhizium anisopliae, botanicals and semiochemicals. Botanicals with attractant, repellent or insecticidal properties are used in conjunction with the fungi to create innovative pest control strategies which will "lure and kill" or "confuse and kill" the targeted insects.

Our work falls into two areas:

Crop Pests: Black vine weevil, Wireworm, Leatherjackets, Aphids, Whitefly, Thrips, Chestnut weevil

Pests of medical and veterinary importance: Ticks, Mosquitoes, Midges, Sandflies

Our research will help growers to eliminate pests that could otherwise destroy crops, helping to prevent hunger, poverty and allowing producers to save money. It will also support global human and animal health and well-being by eliminating sources of disease such as ticks, mosquitos and midges.

Contact details: Tariq Butt (Department of Biosciences) t.butt@swansea.ac.uk

Goal 2 - Zero Hunger

Zero Hunger

Fieldwork in  Sikkim

The College of Science runs a 3rd year field course to Sikkim, in the Indian Himalaya, annually. This is a truly interdisciplinary field course, with students undertaking degrees in both human and physical geography, biology, and zoology all attending. Sikkim is an unique location for fieldwork – renowned for its breathtaking Himalayan environment, rich biodiversity and the strong commitment to environmental values. On the field course, students work individually and in groups to complete interdisciplinary research projects on five themes: urbanisation, hydroelectricity, agriculture, ecotourism and natural hazards. The projects completed under these themes align with the Global Goals for sustainable development and the field course works closely with a variety of partners in Sikkim.

Contact: Osian Elias (Department of Geography) o.h.elias@swansea.ac.uk

Using algae to promote agricultural sustainability and the circular economy 

https://www.biorefine.eu/news/using-algae-promote-agricultural-sustainability-and-circular-economy

Development of biological ‘pesticides’ - See Goal 1

Goal 3 - Good Health and Well-Being

Good Health and Well-Being

 UNSDG Goal 3

 TreeMap 3

Optical measurement of blood glucose levels

Erythrosensors

For diabetics, continuous glucose monitoring ameliorates serious complications from low or high glucose levels. Diabetics measure their blood glucose levels multiple times a day by finger pricks, or by using implantable monitoring devices. Still, glucose levels in the blood fluctuate throughout the day and the current monitoring methods are invasive. Our team works in strategies to isolate a patient’s red blood cells, load them with a fluorescent sensor and use them to provide remote measurement of glucose levels in the bloodstream via an optical system. Sensor-loaded red blood cells have the potential to improve diabetic patients’ lifestyle, and to be implemented to treat, diagnose and monitor other diseases.

Contact details:

S Lopez (Department of Physics) S.C.B.Lopez@Swansea.ac.uk

Cartographic treemap of population health

We propose a cartographic treemap to integrate a modified representation of the UK based on the geo-spatial information of CCG regions combined with a modified treemap to present the multivariate NHS data. This graph shows each region size proportional to its population with an added below average filter (up)  and uniform size output with a below average filter (down).  All the healthcare disorders that exhibit higher than average prevalence are filtered and shown as grey context. Note how the London region is healthier with the exceptions of diabetes and mental health. This is an observation based on multiple variates that would be difficult to make otherwise. 

Contact details:

Chao Tong (Department of Computer Science) tcjohn2046@gmail.com

SUNRISE project

Dr Ian Mabbett, Associate Professor of Chemistry and COO of the SUNRISE project, is helping to improve the lives of people in India

My recent research focuses on problems in developing nations. In 2014 I had a chance encounter with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), where I discovered how 40% of the world’s population have inadequate access to proper toilet facilities. The impact of this is a childhood death rate from diarrhoea that eclipses AIDS, malaria and measles combined. Together with the BMGF I realised that my skills and Swansea’s innovation ethos could help with one of the big challenges. The reality is that technologies to solve these issues need to be commercially viable, we need to derive value from waste by creating other commodities such as fuels or fertilisers and clean water. One thing holding the technologies up is an economic way of pre-processing and de-watering faecal sludge materials. Through my previous work on drying, curing and sintering of various materials I’d gained a lot of experience in radiative drying and this can help pre-treat materials and drive down energy and cost.

Most recently, I have taken a very exciting opportunity to combine all these experiences as chief operating officer of SUNRISE. SUNRISE takes the SPECIFIC-IKC (an academic and industrial consortium led by Swansea University with Tata Steel as the main industrial partner) experience in scaling up production of next generation energy materials, particularly photovoltaics, and making them work in India. The project will develop technology in photovoltaics, energy storage, lighting, biomass and clean water and sanitation and co-create solutions with UK and Indian partners. We will then deploy 5 demonstrator buildings powered by these technologies in India and additionally create a doctorate training programme, similar to Swansea’s industry focused EngD, across both countries.

Contact details:

Dr Ian Mabbett (Department of Chemistry) i.mabbett@swansea.ac.uk

Development of biological ‘pesticides’ - See Goal 1

Goal 4 - Quality Education

Quality Education

Kiosk In India UNSDG

Smart speaker systems in public areas in Indian slums

Millions of homes worldwide enjoy access to digital content and services through smart speakers such as Amazon’s Echo and Google’s Home. Promotional materials and users’ own videos typically show homes that have many well-resourced rooms, with good power and data infrastructures. Over the last several years, we have been working with slum communities in India, whose dwellings are usually very compact (one or two rooms), personal home WiFi is almost unheard of, power infrastructures are far less robust, and financial resources put such smart speakers out of individual household reach. Inspired by the “hole in the wall” internet-kiosk programme, we have designed and built two working smart-speaker systems and installed them within public areas and passageways in a large Indian slum. These prototypes allowed passers-by to ask questions and receive either instant computerised answers or delayed human-curated answers. This work aligns with the UN’s reducing inequality (goal 10), education (goal 4) and innovation (goal 9) goals for sustainable development.

Contact details:

Matt Jones (all Department of Computer Science) 
matt.jones@swansea.ac.uk

Jennifer Pearson 
j.pearson@swansea.ac.uk

Simon Robinson 
s.n.w.robinson@swansea.ac.uk

Thomas Reitmaier 
thomas.reitmaier@swansea.ac.uk

Goal 5 - Gender Equality

Gender Equality

Development of biological 'pesticides' - See Goal 1

Goal 6 - Clean Water and Sanitation

Clean Water and Sanitation

Fire and Water: Predicting and mitigating water pollution risk from wildfire ash

NERC project (2018-2021)

Fires burn ~4% of the global vegetated land surface every year, including forested catchments that provide 60% of the water for the world’s 100 largest cities. The ash deposited on the ground by fires is rich in potential pollutants and highly susceptible to transport by water erosion. Ash, therefore, represents a serious threat to water ecosystems with already known effects on water quality with critical impacts on the population and the environment (i.e. fresh water restrictions, eutrophication, algal blooms, etc.) and substantial costs to restore water ecosystem services (e.g. $32 Mill. Denver in 1996&2002, $38 Mill. Canberra in 2003, £3 Mill. Belfast in 2011, $1 Mill. Fort MacMurray in 2016). However, no models currently exist that enable prediction of ash transport and support design of strategies to mitigate water contamination risk after fire.

This NERC project, led by Swansea University, brings together an international team of leading scientists (Swansea University -UK-, US Forest Service -USA-, and The University of Melbourne -Australia-) and end-users (Welsh Water, South Wales Fire & Rescue Service, Brecon Beacons National Park and Natural Resources Wales) to address this critical knowledge and tools gap. Our goal is to develop an end-user tool to predict the ash delivery and contamination risk to water bodies after wildfires and support land managers (target 6.5) in the design of effective mitigation strategies to protect water quality (target 6.3), drinking water supply (target 6.1), and water-related ecosystems (target 6.6).

Contact details:

Prof. Stefan Doerr (Dpt. of Geography): s.doerr@swansea.ac.uk

Dr. Cristina Santín (Dpt. of Geography and Dpt. of Bioscience): c.santin@swansea.ac.uk

Dr. Jonay Neris (Dpt. of Geography): j.neristome@swansea.ac.uk

Stabilisation and rehabilitation of abandoned metal mines

Throughout the world there is an environmental legacy from historical mining activities. Until the 1970s, it was common practice for mining companies to abandon sites with little or no remediation. The mine tailings are often contaminated with heavy metals and contamination of nearby rivers and water supplies is not uncommon. Working with local companies, we have discovered that the application of amended biochars (carbon-rich product resulting from pyrolysis) to the tailings offers a cost-effective method for the stabilisation and rehabilitation of abandoned metal mines.  Biochar has been demonstrated to store nutrients, immobilise inorganic (heavy metals) and organic contaminants (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, invasive-plant toxins), and aid restoration of former industrial sites and degraded land. It also play an important role in carbon sequestration that can be used to mitigate climate change.

Mine tailings at the abandoned lead mine at Nant y Mwyn (Caption for pic)

Contact:

Iain Robertson (Department of Geography) i.robertson@swansea.ac.uk

SUNRISE project - See Goal 3

Goal 7 - Affordable and Clean Energy

Affordable and Clean Energy

UN Scheme New

Storing solar energy and mitigating CO2 emissions

Moritz F. Kuehnel and his team in the Department of Chemistry are developing novel catalysts to store solar energy and simultaneously mitigate CO2 emissions. Their research utilises the photophysical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals combined with the selectivity of molecular catalysis to drive the conversion of water, waste and CO2 into renewable fuels with sunlight. Their latest project studies the direct generation of clean H2 from lignocellulosic biomass.

Contact details: Dr. Moritz F. Kuehnel (Department of Chemistry) M.F.Kuehnel@Swansea.ac.uk

Turning waste plastic into hydrogen fuel for cars

Dr Moritz Kuehnel in Chemistry is transforming unwanted plastic into hydrogen by adding light-absorbing material to plastic, before it is placed in an alkaline solution and then exposed to sunlight, which creates hydrogen, which could be used as fuel in cars. This is cheaper than recycling as the waste plasctic doesn't have to be cleaned first. 

Fieldwork in Sikkim - See Goal 2

Sunrise project - See Goal 3

Goal 8 - Decent Work and Economic Growth

Decent Work and Economic Growth

Strain 3 LolyTics

Development of biological ‘pesticides’

Training and technology transfer to help individuals in developing countries to acquire new skillsets, develop cottage industries and make better use of resources

Swansea University helped to train scientists at Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University (ATBU), Bauchi, Nigeria on a project to develop biological pesticides. This would allow alleviation of poverty by generating employment through the establishment of small cottage industries for the production of the fungal BCA’s in Nigeria. In addition, the technology could exploit local materials and thus ensure a flow of wealth within the community.

Mosquitoes vector a wide range of diseases (e.g. dengue, yellow fever, malaria, filariasis, heartworm) which can have a devastating impact on human and animal health.  In 2010 there were an estimated 216 million episodes of malaria and an estimated 655,000 malaria deaths with approximately 86% of malaria deaths globally being children under 5 years of age (WHO, 2011).  Dengue is the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease in the world; its geographic range having increased 30-fold within the past 50 years (WHO, 2009).  An estimated 50-100 million dengue infections occur annually and approximately 2.5 billion people live in dengue endemic countries (WHO, 2009, 2012).

The global losses due to tick borne diseases (TBD) is between US$13.9 billion - US$18.7 billion annually. Over 800 million cattle constantly exposed to the threat of ticks. Total annual losses in Tanzania was ca. US$364 million, with ca. 1.3 million cattle killed ((Kivaria, S. 2006. Trop Anim Health Prod. 38:291-9).

The fact that the strains of M. anisopliae could kill both crop pests and disease vectors made the fungus more commercially viable.  This should reassure stakeholders that there was a demand for the product but this could be met through local production. Creation of a cottage industry to mass produce the fungus would create wealth and jobs but also ensure supply of a sustainable, environmentally friendly product.

ATBU, Bauchi research team received intensive training on different aspects of insect pest control. They received training in:

  • Axenic culture of fungal biological control agents (BCAs)
  • Isolation of fungal BCAs using selective media
  • Screening of different media to identify ones which were inexpensive and gave high yields of inoculum.
  • Upscaling production of fungal BCAs
  • Designing and conducting laboratory and field assays
  • Improving the efficacy of the fungal BCAs by using them in combination with other agents such as entomopathogenic nematodes.

Additional work was done in the isolation and production of entomopathogenic nematodes.

Goal 9 - Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

Physical Web _2

The Physical Web in Mumbai and Nairobi

Over several years, our team has been involved in participatory design of novel future technologies with people in resource-constrained contexts in India and Kenya. A key motivator is to include these groups, who often have lower literacy, infrequent access to data connections, low exposure to technology, and other constraints, in the process of shaping and appropriating devices and services. This is in contrast to what typically happens in such regions, where technologies from traditional markets (e.g., in USA and Europe) “trickle down” after several years. As part of this work, we have explored the potential and barriers of one such new platform—the Physical Web—in resource-constrained contexts in Mumbai and Nairobi. The Physical Web is an open source Bluetooth-based beacon system, which aims to provide quick and seamless interaction with physical objects over a web platform. Our goal is to understand how this emerging technology might provide local small enterprise traders in these regions with the facility to quickly and easily create and distribute a simple on-line presence via a local broadcasting medium. This work connects with the UN’s reducing inequality (goal 10) and innovation (goal 9) goals for sustainable development.

Contact details:

Matt Jones (all Department of Computer Science) 
matt.jones@swansea.ac.uk

Jennifer Pearson 
j.pearson@swansea.ac.uk

Simon Robinson 
s.n.w.robinson@swansea.ac.uk

Thomas Reitmaier 
thomas.reitmaier@swansea.ac.uk

 

Smart speaker systems in public areas in Indian slums

Millions of homes worldwide enjoy access to digital content and services through smart speakers such as Amazon’s Echo and Google’s Home. Promotional materials and users’ own videos typically show homes that have many well-resourced rooms, with good power and data infrastructures. Over the last several years, we have been working with slum communities in India, whose dwellings are usually very compact (one or two rooms), personal home WiFi is almost unheard of, power infrastructures are far less robust, and financial resources put such smart speakers out of individual household reach. Inspired by the “hole in the wall” internet-kiosk programme, we have designed and built two working smart-speaker systems and installed them within public areas and passageways in a large Indian slum. These prototypes allowed passers-by to ask questions and receive either instant computerised answers or delayed human-curated answers. This work aligns with the UN’s reducing inequality (goal 10), education (goal 4) and innovation (goal 9) goals for sustainable development.

Contact details:

Matt Jones (all Department of Computer Science) 
matt.jones@swansea.ac.uk

Jennifer Pearson 
j.pearson@swansea.ac.uk

Simon Robinson 
s.n.w.robinson@swansea.ac.uk

Thomas Reitmaier 
thomas.reitmaier@swansea.ac.uk

Itinerative design - driving digital innovation through the periphery of mainstream design's current remit

“Designed in California” is a brand statement used by high-tech manufacturers to denote provenance and cachet of digital innovation and modernity. In our work we explore philosophically alternate design perspectives to those this statement embodies via a long-term multi-sited project that seeks to diversify future-making by engaging communities of “emergent” users in “developing” regions. We argue that digital technologies are typically created with the design lens firmly focused on “first world” populations, assuming a base set of cultural norms, resource availabilities and technological experience levels that do not strongly align with those of emergent users. We argue for inclusive technology design methods and present the notion of itinerative design; a methodology that pivots between emergent user communities across multiple regions, driving digital innovation through the periphery of mainstream design's current remit. This research connects with the UN’s reducing inequality (goal 10) and innovation (goal 9) goals for sustainable development by engaging otherwise overlooked users in the co-creation of future technology.

Contact details:

Matt Jones (all Department of Computer Science) 
matt.jones@swansea.ac.uk

Jennifer Pearson 
j.pearson@swansea.ac.uk

Simon Robinson 
s.n.w.robinson@swansea.ac.uk

Thomas Reitmaier 
thomas.reitmaier@swansea.ac.uk

Development of biological ‘pesticides’ - Training and technology transfer to help individuals in developing countries to acquire new skillsets, develop cottage industries and make better use of resources

Goal 10 - Reduced Inequalities

Reduced Inequalities

The Physical Web in Mumbai and Nairobi

Smart speaker systems in public areas in Indian slums - see Goal 9

Itinerative design - driving digital innovation through the periphery of mainstream design's current remit - see Goal 9

Development of biological ‘pesticides’ - See Goal 1

Goal 11 - Sustainable Cities and Communities

Sustainable Cities and Communities

Fieldwork in Sikkim - See Goal 2

Stabilisation and rehabilitation of abandoned metal mines - See Goal 6

Goal 12 - Responsible Consumption and Production

Responsible Consumption and Production

Renewable nanomaterials

Biochar is a by-product of the biomass thermal transformation into energy or biofuels using pyrolysis or gasification processes. In collaboration with the Beacon project, our team is using biochar depolymerisation as a sustainable method to produce fluorescent nanomaterials from different wastes. Transformation of wastes into nanomaterials has multiple benefits including: energy and waste management savings, and reduced the environmental impact and carbon footprint.

Contact details:

S Lopez (Department of Physics) S.C.B.Lopez@Swansea.ac.uk

Using whelk shells in cosmetics

Shellfish processing plants in Wales produce a large amount of shell waste, the disposal of which in local waters has become a contentious environmental management issue, with some coastal residents considering it detrimental to the local environment and property value. Quay Fresh & Frozen Foods (QFFF), a company based in New Quay, is an SME specialising in processing whelks from local catch. It generates approximately 800 tons of crushed shell waste yearly. Crushed shells have been successfully used in other countries to make water filtration devices, as soil conditioners, construction materials and sludge aggregating agents. SEACAMS 2 is testing alternative uses and products created from the shell waste.

A novel potential application that has not been studied is the use of shells as a substitute for plastic microbeads. Microbeads are ubiquitous in many household products, and their eventual discharge has led to widespread plastic pollution in the environment. The UK and many other industrial nations have committed to phase out microbead usage. Shells, when refined to the appropriate shape and size (microshells), could potentially be an environmentally sustainable alternative that provide the same exfoliating function as microbeads. SEACAMS2 will test the suitability of whelk ‘microshells’ as a substitute for microbeads. Microbeads as an artificial material, can be engineered to specific properties. Whelk shells on the other hand are natural material but with limited scope for modification. This project aims to mechanically refine whelk shells to microscopic size and examine their physical and chemical properties. If ‘microshells’ can replace microbeads in household products, the outcome could lead to a new patent and a new commercial product.

Watch Chiara Bertelli discuss this with the BBC.

Contact details:

Chiara Bertelli (Department of Biosciences) c.m.bertelli@swansea.ac.uk

Development of biological ‘pesticides’ - See Goal 1

Turning waste plastic into hydrogen fuel for cars - See Goal 7

 

Goal 13 - Climate Action

Climate Action

Stabilisation and rehabilitation of abandoned metal mines - see Goal 6

Research is underway to understand the effect of a warmer world for a range of marine species. 

Target 13.3 is to ‘Build knowledge and capacity to meet climate change challenges.’

Research is underway to understand the effect of a warmer world for a range of marine species. Reptiles and some fish have temperature dependent sex determination, which means that a warmer marine environment will lead to skewed sex ratios. For example, warmer incubation conditions for sea turtle nests leads to a greater number of female sea turtles. Research has documented that many sea turtle rookeries already produce a high proportion of female hatchlings (e.g. Caribbean island of St Eustatius) and only a few nesting beaches produce a balanced ratio of male : female hatchlings (e.g. Diego Garcia in the British Indian Ocean Territory). Experimental work is underway to identify low cost and simple ways to protect sea turtles populations in the face of climate change.

Reference: Esteban et al. (2017) Scientific Reports. Link: https://www.nature.com/articles/srep20339

Reference: Laloe, Esteban et al. (2016) Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology. Link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jembe.2015.09.015

Contact details:

Nicole Estaban (Department of Biosciences) N.Esteban@Swansea.ac.uk

Goal 14 - Life Below Water

Life Below Water

Promoting resilient aquaculture

Monitoring seagrass meadows – Indian Ocean and worldwide

Target 14.2 under this goal is ‘By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans.’

An understanding of the location and extent of critical marine ecosystems underpins this target. Much of the Indian Ocean is unexplored due to the remoteness of island systems and depth of marine ecosystems. Research is underway to identify and map vast seagrass meadows associated with coral reef atolls in the Western Indian Ocean using the latest satellite tracking technology (Fastloc-GPS) and remote underwater video surveys.

Reference : Hays, Esteban et al. (2018) Frontiers in Marine Science. Link : https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2018.00009)

Reference : Esteban et al. (2018) Marine Pollution Bulletin. Link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2018.03.018

Contact details:

Nicole Estaban (Department of Biosciences) N.Esteban@Swansea.ac.uk

Tracking of green turtles

In collaboration with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, researchers are tracking green turtles from the British Indian Ocean Territory to distant foraging grounds in Kenya, Madagascar, Maldives and Seychelles. A current research project objective is a survey of fish assemblages in newly discovered seagrass meadows. The foraging grounds of green sea turtles around the atolls of the Seychelles have been used to shape the policy of the newly declared Seychelles MPA.

Contact details:

Nicole Estaban (Department of Biosciences) N.Esteban@Swansea.ac.uk

Conservation of marine reserve in the Indian Ocean

Target 14.5 is ‘By 2020, conserve at least 10 per cent of coastal and marine areas, consistent with national and international law and based on the best available scientific information.’

Researchers at Swansea University are working in a range of Marine Protected Areas worldwide, including one of the largest MPAs, the Chagos Marine Reserve in the Western Indian Ocean to assist with conservation policy. Conservation work has ranged from working with local communities to enhance benefits of MPAs for livelihoods (DFID funded research in the Caribbean), setting up a long-term conservation trust fund in the Dutch Caribbean, establishing the benefits of MPAs for fisheries (Dutch Caribbean MPAs) and understanding the movement of marine fauna within and outside of MPAs (Caribbean, Indian Ocean). Research has guided management plans for MPAs and we are currently working with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office to develop the Management Plan for the British Indian Ocean Territory.  

Reference: Hays, Esteban et al. (2014) Conservation Biology. Link: https://doi.org/10.1111/cobi.12325

Reference: Esteban et al. (2016) Marine Biology. Link: https://doi.org/10.1111/cobi.12325

Reference: Christiansen, Esteban et al. (2017) Marine Biology. Link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00227-016-3048-y

Contact details:

Nicole Estaban (Department of Biosciences) N.Esteban@Swansea.ac.uk

Using whelk shells in cosmetics

The Bluefish Project

BlueFish is a consortium led by Bangor University bringing together Aberystwyth and Swansea Universities in Wales, the Marine Institute, Bord Iascaigh Mhara and the University College of Cork in Ireland. BlueFish will develop knowledge and understanding of the marine resources of the Irish Sea and Celtic Seas by addressing knowledge gaps regarding the effects on and potential vulnerability of selected commercial fish and shellfish from predicted climate change.

Monitoring Ocean Acidification

We have an ongoing interdisplinary PhD project collaboration between Professor Peter Dunstan of our Physics Department and Professor Kevin Flynn of our Biosciences Department which involves incorporating nano-particle sensors into planktonic species to monitor the effects of ocean acidification.  The PhD student Mrs Nadiah Aldaleeli has worked extensively to develop robust pH nano-sensors that the species will be internalised for us to then interrogate with optical spectroscopy in a laboratory environment.  Hence we can directly measure internal pH levels and exploring how planktonic species adapt to the simulated effects of ocean acidification.

 

Goal 15 - Life on Land

Life on Land

Using algae to promote agricultural sustainability and the circular economy - See Goal 1

Development of biological ‘pesticides’ - See Goal 1

Goal 16 - Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

Peace and Justice Strong Institutions

Peace, justice and strong insitutions

Goal 17 - Partnerships for the Goals

Partnerships for the Goals

Partnerships for the goals