Swansea set to become global medical technologies and nanohealth hub with new award

Swansea University’s Centre for NanoHealth (CNH) and Human Computer Interactions research group is set to become a global nanohealth hub with the help of a new £500,000 grant from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

The ‘Global Hub in Medical Technologies and NanoHealth at Swansea University’ came into effect on April 1, 2012.  It will facilitate a series of staff exchanges over a 12 month period to build on current and new research initiatives with Swansea’s international research partners.

Professor Steve Wilks, Head of the College of Science at Swansea University said: “Much international collaboration has been forged through CNH’s activity, particularly with leading international institutions in Medical Technologies and NanoHealth. For example, Swansea has a long standing relationship with institutions in the United States including Texas A&M University, the University of Pennsylvania, Rice University and The Methodist Hospital Research Institute in Houston.

“Developments have included point of care technologies in the detection and analysis of abnormal blood clotting; toxicological impact of natural and engineered nanoparticles; and smart systems to deliver drugs.”

The EPSRC grant, awarded specifically to internationally mobilise staff expertise, means that factors which often stifle and frustrate academic activity and advances will be eliminated.

Through the Hub, Swansea researchers will have the freedom to take their knowledge and creative solutions about vital health issues to countries including China, France and the US.

The Global Hub will rapidly internationalise areas of strength in Swansea University’s existing EPSRC-funded portfolio of activities in four key areas: technology development, safety assessment, therapeutics, and human factors engineering.

“This opportunity will enable our researchers to improve an individual’s quality of life through targeted drug delivery, make possible the ability for patients to manage their own drug delivery within the comfort of their own homes and reduce human error through improved user interfaces with devices that deliver drugs,” said Professor Wilks.

“The new Global Hub is vital in enhancing our existing collaborations and developing new joint ventures through the mobilisation of staff to those countries where we have key partners in nanohealth.   

“The award will add value through working across disciplines in the arts, humanities and social sciences. This broad approach will deliver further potential for the social and cultural aspects to influence and shape nanohealth developments.

“Our current EPSRC funded Bridging the Gaps portfolio has funded more than 50 interdisciplinary, innovative research projects such as novel applications to address blood clotting, redesigning conventional computer systems to support healthcare and public engagement of science.

“In particular the funding will give staff at an early stage in their research careers the opportunity to become international career researchers and enable established researchers to flourish in their international commitments; in short the project aims to ensure Swansea University’s European Centre for Nanohealth is, and is seen to be, the Global Hub in Medical Technologies and Nanohealth.”

Much international collaboration has been forged through CNH’s activity, particularly with leading international institutions in Medical Technologies and NanoHealth. For example, Swansea has a long standing relationship with institutions in the United States including Texas A&M University, the University of Pennsylvania, Rice University and The Methodist Hospital Research Institute in Houston.

“Developments have included point of care technologies in the detection and analysis of abnormal blood clotting; toxicological impact of natural and engineered nanoparticles; and smart systems to deliver drugs.”

The EPSRC grant, awarded specifically to internationally mobilise staff expertise, means that factors which often stifle and frustrate academic activity and advances will be eliminated.

Through the Hub, Swansea researchers will have the freedom to take their knowledge and creative solutions about vital health issues to countries including China, France and the US.

The Global Hub will rapidly internationalise areas of strength in Swansea University’s existing EPSRC-funded portfolio of activities in four key areas: technology development, safety assessment, therapeutics, and human factors engineering.

“This opportunity will enable our researchers to improve an individual’s quality of life through targeted drug delivery, make possible the ability for patients to manage their own drug delivery within the comfort of their own homes and reduce human error through improved user interfaces with devices that deliver drugs,” said Professor Wilks.

“The new Global Hub is vital in enhancing our existing collaborations and developing new joint ventures through the mobilisation of staff to those countries where we have key partners in nanohealth.   

“The award will add value through working across disciplines in the arts, humanities and social sciences. This broad approach will deliver further potential for the social and cultural aspects to influence and shape nanohealth developments.

“Our current EPSRC funded Bridging the Gaps portfolio has funded more than 50 interdisciplinary, innovative research projects such as novel applications to address blood clotting, redesigning conventional computer systems to support healthcare and public engagement of science.

“In particular the funding will give staff at an early stage in their research careers the opportunity to become international career researchers and enable established researchers to flourish in their international commitments; in short the project aims to ensure Swansea University’s European Centre for Nanohealth is, and is seen to be, the Global Hub in Medical Technologies and Nanohealth.”

Swansea University’s Centre for NanoHealth (CNH) is a unique interdisciplinary research centre based on the application of Nanotechnology and leading innovations in Healthcare.

This joint initiative between the University’s Institute of Life Science in the College of Medicine, the Multidisciplinary Nanotechnology Centre in the College of Engineering, and the Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University NHS Trust, offers exciting opportunities to work at the interface between Engineering Biomedical Science and clinical delivery.

The CNH is located within a Clinical and Biomedical research environment on Swansea’s Singleton hospital site, giving access to patients and creating a pioneering, integrated facility in which novel devices and sensors can be designed, manufactured, functionalised, tested and evaluated.

Visit http://www.swan.ac.uk/engineering/nanohealth/

Both the South Wales Evening Post (page 20) and Welsh Icons report that Swansea University is set to become a global nanohealth hub with a new award http://www.thisissouthwales.co.uk/Grant-helps-uni-carry-global-medical-studies/story-15802309-detail/story.html, http://www.welshicons.org.uk/news/health/swansea-set-to-become-global-medical-technologies-and-nanohealth-hub-with-new-award

For this news in Welsh

This news item was generated by Bethan Evans <b.w.evans@swansea.ac.uk>
Thursday 12 April 2012 00.00 GMT
Swansea University, Tel: 01792 295049