Charter for Equality in Science

The Athena SWAN Charter recognises excellence in Science, Technology, Engineering, Medicine and Mathematics (STEMM) employment in Higher Education. Swansea University College of Science is making considerable inroads in effecting a change of culture, notably via our Equality and Diversity Forum and engagement with Athena SWAN and we embrace good practice in recruiting, retaining and promoting equality in STEMM in higher education.

There are ten Athena SWAN principles in the new expanding charter:

  1. We acknowledge that academia cannot reach its full potential unless it can benefit from the talents of all.
  2. We commit to advancing gender equality in academia, in particular, addressing the loss of women across the career pipeline and the absence of women from senior academic, professional and support roles.
  3. We commit to addressing unequal gender representation across academic disciplines and professional and support function.
  4. We commit to tackling the gender pay gap.
  5. We commit to removing the obstacles faced by women, in particular, at major points of career development and progression including the transition from PhD into a sustainable academic career.
  6. We commit to addressing the negative consequences of using short-term contracts for the retention and progression of staff in academia, particularly women.
  7. We commit to tackling the discriminatory treatment often experienced by trans people.
  8. We acknowledge that advancing gender equality demands commitment and action from all levels of the organisation and in particular active leadership from those in senior roles.
  9. We commit to making and mainstreaming sustainable structural and cultural changes to advance gender equality, recognising that initiatives and actions that support individuals alone will not sufficiently advance equality.
  10. All individuals have identities shaped by several different factors. We commit to considering the intersection of gender and other factors wherever possible.

Dr Carole Llewellyn is the Chair of the Self-Assessment Team (SAT) for the College of Science. The college is now actively delivering towards achieving a Silver Award.

Award success for the College of Science!

Athena SWANThe College of Science was awarded an Athena SWAN Bronze Award in all five of our subject areas in 2014. The award recognises commitment to advancing careers in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine (STEMM) in higher education and research. The college is currently working towards their new submission in 2017. 

Bronze Award Success!

Bronze award

Equality and Diversity Discussion Forum

Work-Shadowing Discussion Group

Work-shadowing discussion group

Guest Speaker Seminar

Prof. Christine Maggs from Bournemouth University gives an inspiring talk 'Lessons from Bournemouth University: changing the equality culture in academia'

 

Our Action Plan

Action plan logo

Athena SWAN COS Action Plan

Royal Society of Biology: Best Practice Workshop

Parent Carer Scientist

Parent carer

Parent carers

Unconscious Bias

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Tackling Unconscious Bias in Science

On the 10 May 2016 some members of staff from the College of Science attended a training session held by the Equality Challenge Unit entitled,

'Blame it on the brain: what is unconscious bias, how does it affect how we relate to others, and what can we do about it?'

The training session was successful and positive feedback was received. Testimonials:

"Increased overall awareness of unconscious bias"

"This training has made me more aware of my own biases and how to recognise them"

 Learn more about ‌Unconscious Bias (downloadable resources)

  • Nature Article: Speak up about subtle sexism in science
  • Unconscious Bias Literature Review
  •   Measuring Unconscious Bias
  • Implicit association tests (IATs): 

    An implicit association test (IAT) is a measure within social psychology designed to detect the strength of a person’s automatic associations between representations of objects or concepts. IATs are used to examine positive or negative associations and are a way of measuring our implicit biases. 

    The IAT is a metric often used within social psychology to measure the strength of a person’s automatic association between mental representations of social groups (concepts) and positive or negative ideas (constructs) and, while not universally accepted as a valid and reliable measure of a person’s unconscious bias, is at present, the dominant method for assessment .

    Taking an implicit association test will familiarise you with the method used to measure unconscious bias and may also provide you with some insights into your own biases. It is a good way to identify:

    =        biases which you may not be aware of

    =        biases which you may not want to admit to having. 

    You will find a range of implicit association tests on the Project Implicit website. Project Implicit is a non-profit organisation and international collaboration between researchers who are interested in implicit bias.  The tests are free to access and complete.

    =        https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/research/

Links and Resources