Foundation Lectures

Ben and Jenny

Founding the Foundry is a programme of exciting events and activities to celebrate the opening of the Computational Foundry, including the Foundation Lecture series, residencies by leading researchers and industrialists, and agenda setting symposia.


Algorithmic Accountability: Designing for Safety by Professor Ben Shneiderman

Date: Tuesday 24th July

Time: 12.00pm

Venue: The Mall, Taliesin Arts Centre

Light refreshments will be provided

These lectures are aimed at a general audience and open to the public

Missed the Lecture? Watch the lecture on our youtube channel soon!


About Ben Shneiderman

Ben Shneiderman is a Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Computer Science, Founding Director (1983-2000) of the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory, and a Member of the UM Institute for Advanced Computer Studies at the University of Maryland. He is a Fellow of the AAAS, ACM, IEEE, and NAI, and a Member of the National Academy of Engineering, in recognition of his pioneering contributions to human-computer interaction and information visualization. His contributions include the direct manipulation concept, clickable highlighted web-links, touchscreen keyboards, dynamic query sliders, development of treemaps, novel network visualizations for NodeXL, and temporal event sequence analysis for electronic health records.

Shneiderman is the lead author of Designing the User Interface: Strategies for Effective Human-Computer Interaction (6th ed., 2016). He co-authored Readings in Information Visualization: Using Vision to Think with Stu Card and Jock Mackinlay and Analyzing Social Media Networks with NodeXL with Derek Hansen and Marc Smith. Shneiderman’s book The New ABCs of Research: Achieving Breakthrough Collaborations (Oxford, April 2016), has an accompanying short book Rock the Research: Your Guidebook to Accelerating Campus Discovery and Innovation (2018). 

Abstract

Vital services, such as communications, financial trading, healthcare, and transportation depend on sophisticated algorithms, some relying on unpredictable artificial intelligence techniques, such as deep learning, that are increasingly embedded in complex software systems. As high-speed trading, medical devices, and autonomous aircraft become more widely implemented, stronger checks become necessary to prevent failures. Design strategies that promote human-centered systems, which are comprehensible, predictable, and controllable can increase safety and make failure investigations more effective. Social strategies that support human-centered independent oversight during planning, continuous monitoring during operation, and retrospective analyses following failures can play a powerful role in making more reliable and trustworthy systems. Clarifying responsibility for failures stimulates improved design thinking.


Citizen Science: New Agendas, Broader impacts by Professor Jennifer Preece

Date: Thursday 26th July

Time: 12.00pm

Venue: The Mall, Taliesin Arts Centre

Light refreshments will be provided

These lectures are aimed at a general audience and open to the public


About Jennifer Preece 

Jennifer Preece is a Professor and Dean Emerita in the Information School at the University of Maryland, USA. She is particularly interested in how Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and Interaction Design can support communities to collect and document biodiversity and environmental data through citizen science projects. Currently she is the principal investigator on a project about community driven environmental projects, funded by the US National Science Foundation. She is a SIGCHI Fellow, author of a broad collection of published articles, and co-author of Interaction Design: Beyond HCI (4th ed., 2015).

Abstract

Citizen science employs design methods to organize communities of various sizes to provide reliable and trusted data that creates measurable and meaningful impacts. Compelling examples drawn from biodiversity and environmental science will illustrate new paradigms for doing research in which experts partner with citizens to exploit digital technologies to achieve scientific and broader societal impacts. New agendas that arise from citizen science include resolving the tension between encouraging public participation and ensuring reliable and trusted data. 

 

Foundation Lectures

Moshi Vardi

Founding the Foundry is a programme of exciting events and activities to celebrate the opening of the Computational Foundry, including the Foundation Lecture series, residencies by leading researchers and industrialists, and agenda setting symposia.


The Automated-Reasoning Revolution: From Theory to Practice and Back 

Date: Wednesday 27th June

Time: 12.00pm

Venue: Computational Foundry Seminar Room - Talbot 909

Light refreshments will be provided

These lectures are aimed at a general audience and open to the public

Missed the Lecture? 'Click here' to watch the lecture on our youtube channel


About Moshi Vardi

Moshe Y. Vardi is the George Distinguished Service Professor in Computational Engineering and Director of the Ken Kennedy Institute for Information Technology at Rice University. He is the recipient of three IBM Outstanding Innovation Awards, the ACM SIGACT Goedel Prize, the ACM Kanellakis Award, the ACM SIGMOD Codd Award, the Blaise Pascal Medal, the IEEE Computer Society Goode Award, the EATCS Distinguished Achievements Award, the Southeastern Universities Research Association's Distinguished Scientist Award, and the Church Award. He is the author and co-author of over 500 papers, as well as two books: Reasoning about Knowledge and Finite Model Theory and Its Applications. He is a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery, the American Association for Artificial Intelligence, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the European Association for Theoretical Computer Science, the Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers, and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. He is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering and National Academy of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Science, the European Academy of Science, and Academia Europaea. He holds honorary doctorates from the Saarland University in Germany, Orleans University in France, UFRGS in Brazil, and the University of Liege in Belgium. He is currently a Senior Editor of the Communications of the ACM, after having served for a decade as Editor-in-Chief.

Abstract

For the past 40 years computer scientists generally believed that NP-complete problems are intractable. In particular, Boolean satisfiability (SAT), as a paradigmatic automated-reasoning problem, has been considered to be intractable. Over the past 20 years, however, there has been a quiet, but dramatic, revolution, and very large SAT instances are now being solved routinely as part of software and hardware design. In this talk I will review this amazing development and show how automated reasoning is now an industrial reality.

I will then describe how we can leverage SAT solving to accomplish other automated-reasoning tasks.  Counting the number of satisfying truth assignments of a given Boolean formula or sampling such assignments uniformly at random are fundamental computational problems in computer science with applications in software testing, software synthesis, machine learning, personalized learning, and more.  While the theory of these problems has been thoroughly investigated since the 1980s, approximation algorithms developed by theoreticians do not scale up to industrial-sized instances.  Algorithms used by the industry offer better scalability, but give up certain correctness guarantees to achieve scalability. We describe a novel approach, based on universal hashing and Satisfiability Modulo Theory, that scales to formulas with hundreds of thousands of variables without giving up correctness guarantees.

 

Foundation Lectures

Founding the Foundry Susan Dray

Founding the Foundry is a programme of exciting events and activities to celebrate the opening of the Computational Foundry, including the Foundation Lecture series, residencies by leading researchers and industrialists, and agenda setting symposia.


Computational Foundry - Who we are and what we do

Date: Tuesday 12th June

Time: 1.00pm

Venue: The Studio, Taliesin Arts Centre

Light refreshments will be provided 

These lectures are aimed at a general audience and open to the public

Missed the Lecture? 'Click here' to watch the lecture on our youtube channel 


About Susan Dray

Susan Dray is a founding member of the ACM Special Interest Group in Computer-Human Interaction (SIGCHI), and has been a leader in the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) [now known as User Experience (UX)] research since beginning her career in a Human Factors group at Honeywell in 1979.  Early in her career, she was one of the first to make contextual research a core part of UX. At American Express, she established the first dedicated  corporate usability lab in a non-tech company. She was among the first to conduct international user research. As a consultant since 1993, Susan has worked with a long list of clients, including Microsoft, Hewlett Packard, Intel, Xerox, LG, Autodesk, IBM, SAP, and many others.  She has also partnered with design firms such as IDEO.

Through her consulting and courses that she offered for many years at CHI, BCS-HCI, UXPA, Interact, and other venues, Susan inspired a generation of academics and practitioners to move beyond a focus on usability to UX more broadly, and to bring cross-cultural understanding of users into product development. Susan has trained and mentored many researchers who now occupy faculty positions in leading computer science programs, as well as leadership positions in industry.  In recent years, she has devoted energy to her passion of promoting the development of UX communities globally, most recently by leading a SIGCHI-sponsored effort, SIGCHI Across Borders. As the first step, she recently led symposia in Alexandria, Egypt, focusing on HCI in the Arabic-speaking world, and in Guatemala City, focusing on Spanish-speaking Central and South America.

A Fellow of both the ACM and the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES), Susan has been honored with Lifetime Achievement Awards from both SIGCHI and the User Experience Professionals Association (UXPA).  She also  a member of the CHI Academy, and serves on the SIGCHI Executive Committee as Vice President At-Large, focusing on HCI in the so-called “Developing World” as well as Global HCI Education  She was on the UXPA Board of Directors for 6 years as Director of Publications, overseeing the move from print to online only of the organization’s UX magazine.  She has also served as both a Column and a Forum editor for SIGCHI’s Interactions Magazine. Susan has a Ph.D in psychology from UCLA, where she studied neuroscience and behaviour.

 

Foundation Lectures

 Delaram Kahrobaei

Founding the Foundry is a programme of exciting events and activities to celebrate the opening of the Computational Foundry, including the Foundation Lecture series, residencies by leading researchers and industrialists, and agenda setting symposia.


Medical diagnostic based on encrypted medical data by Dr Delaram Kahrobaei

Date: Monday 5th March

Time: 12:00pm 

Venue: Talbot 909, Ground floor of Talbot Building

Light refreshments will be provided 

These lectures are aimed at a general audience and open to the public


About Dr Delaram Kahrobaei

Dr. Delaram Kahrobaei is a Full Professor at the City University of New York. She has a joint appointment at CUNY Graduate Center in the PhD Program in Computer Science as well as the M.S. Program in Data Science and at NYCCT (CUNY) in the Mathematics Department. Besides her position at CUNY, she is also an Adjunct Professor of Computer Science at the New York University as well as the President/co-founder of a university start-up Infoshield, Inc.

Her main research area is Post-Quantum Algebraic Cryptography, Information Security, Data Science, Computational/Algorithmic Group Theory. Her research has been partially supported by grants ($1.160 M) from the Office of Naval Research (ONR, $900K), American Association of Advancement in Sciences (AAAS), National Science Foundation (NSF), National Security Agency (NSA), Research Foundation of CUNY (RF), City Tech Foundation, London Mathematical Society, Edinburgh Mathematical Society, Swiss National Foundation, Institut Henri Poincare, Association for Women in Mathematics (AMM). She has 41 publications in prestigious journals and conference proceedings including 4 edited books in AMS (3) and De Gruyter (1), since 2004 when she obtained her PhD. During her PhD studies, she was a member of New York Group Theory cooperative as well as Center for Algorithmic and Scientific Software both founded by her PhD advisor Gilbert Baumslag.

Her educational effort had been partially supported by grants from NASA and NSF ($400K). Delaram is the director of C-LAC, Center for Logic, Algebra and Computation. She is in the Advisory Committee for the newly created CUNY Hub for Innovation and Entrepreneurship. Kahrobaei is a member of faculty advisory board of the Data Science @CUNY. She is the founder of New York Women in Mathematics and Computing Network and received NSF grant ($230K) to support such activities. She is in the board of advisory at LifeNome, Inc.

 

Foundation Lectures

Tim KindbergFounding the Foundry is a programme of exciting events and activities to celebrate the opening of the Computational Foundry, including the Foundation Lecture series, residencies by leading researchers and industrialists, and agenda setting symposia.


What Computers Can Do: A Sceptical, Unreasonable and Creative Approach by Tim Kindberg

Date: Tuesday 16th January

Time: 12:30pm

Venue: Science Central, Wallace Building

Light refreshments will be provided from 12:30pm at Science Central

These lectures are aimed at a general audience and open to the public

Please follow this link to view the presentation given at this lecture  'Founding the Foundry' presentation

Missed the Lecture? Watch the lecture on our youtube channel CLICK HERE


Tim Kindberg - Residency

From Monday 15th February to Friday 26th February 

Throughout this two week period a series of events will be hosted by Cherish Digital Economy Research Centre and the Computational Foundry -   Tim Kindberg residencies

Follow these links to view the presentations from the Workshops held throughout the Residency:

Workshop presentation - InnovationWorkshop presentation - Research

 

Foundation Lectures

 The Future of Familiar Technology

Founding the Foundry is a programme of exciting events and activities to celebrate the opening of the Computational Foundry, including the Foundation Lecture series, residencies by leading researchers and industrialists, and agenda setting symposia.


Search: The Future of a Familiar Technology by Professor Richard Harper

Date: Wednesday 29th November

Time: 1:30pm

Venue: Wallace Lecture Theatre

Light refreshments will be provided from 12:30pm at Science Central

These lectures are aimed at a general audience and open to the public

Missed the Lecture? Watch the lecture on our youtube channel CLICK HERE


About Professor Richard Harper

Professor Harper is an expert in user-focused technical innovation in academic, corporate, and small company settings.

He combines a wealth of academic and industry experience, having led research groups at Xerox (Euro) Parc and Microsoft, and has founded and jointly led start-up companies with clients such as Hewlett Packard and Vodafone.

A visiting professor at Swansea University, Professor Harper was the director and founder of the Digital Research World Centre at the University of Surrey. He is currently Co-Director of the Institute of Social Futures at the University of Lancaster and Professor of Computer Science at the same institution.

Having written 13 books, including the award-winning ‘The Myth of the Paperless Office’, he has also published over 160 scientific articles on topics covering a wide range of topics, from the social impact and design of mobile phones, to the future of search engines, to the latest incarnation of artificial intelligence.