MSc Clinical Science (Medical Physics)

Course Overview

Medical physicists fill a special niche in the health industry. The role includes opportunities for laboratory work, basic and applied research, management and teaching, which offers a uniquely diverse career path. In addition there is satisfaction in contributing directly to patient treatment and care.
This three-year programme, hosted by the College of Medicine, builds on an existing collaboration with the NHS in providing the primary route for attaining the professional title of Clinical Scientist in the field of Medical Physics.

Key Features

The programme is accredited by the NHS and provides the academic component of the Scientist Training Programme for medical physics trainees, within the Modernising Scientific Careers framework defined by the UK Department of Health, and offers students the chance to specialise in either radiotherapy physics or radiation safety. This Master’s degree is only suitable for trainees sponsored by an NHS or an equivalent health care provider.

Modules

Disclaimer: Module selection options may change.

Year 1 (Level 7 PGT)

Year 2 (Level 7 PGT)

HE Level 7 Masters / PGDip / PGCert

Students choose 30 credits from the following:

Compulsory Modules
Module CodeSemesterCreditsModule Name
PMPM02Semester 2 (Jan - Jun Taught)10Research Methods in Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering
Optional Modules
Optional Modules 

Choose Exactly 20 credits from the following Modules:

NOTE : Please select one module from the list below.

Module CodeSemesterCreditsModule NameGuidance
PMPM11Semester 2 (Jan - Jun Taught)20Advanced Radiotherapy
PMPM19Semester 2 (Jan - Jun Taught)20Advanced Radiation Safety

Description

Modules on the course can vary each year but you could expect to study:                                

• Introduction to Clinical Science

• Medical Imaging

• Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging

• Radiation Protection

• Radiotherapy Physics

• Research Methods

• Advanced Radiotherapy

• Specialist Radiotherapy

• Advanced Radiation Safety

• Specialist Radiation Safety

Entry Requirements

First or a second class honours degree in engineering or the physical sciences.

This Master’s degree is only suitable for trainees sponsored by an NHS or equivalent Health-care Provider.

 

How To Apply

Apply online and track your application status at www.swansea.ac.uk/applyonline

Tuition Fees

Annual tuition fees for entry in the academic year 2016/17 are as follows:

UK/EU International
MSc Part-time £5,300 £16,200

Tuition fees for years of study after your first year are subject to an increase of 3%.

You can find further information on fees and how to pay on our tuition fees page.

You may be eligible for funding to help support your study. To find out about scholarships, bursaries and other funding opportunities that are available please visit the University's scholarships and bursaries page.

International students and part-time study: If you require a Tier 4 student visa you must be studying full-time. If you are in the UK under a different visa category, it may be possible for you to study part-time. Please see our part-time study and visas page for more information.

Current students: You can find further information of your fee costs on our tuition fees page.

Additional Costs

The tuition fees do not cover costs incurred personally by the student such as the purchase of books or stationery, printing or photocopying costs.

Course Structure

MSc programmes are modular in structure, supporting integration of the trainee within the workplace. Students must obtain a total of 180 credits to qualify for the degree. This is made up of 120 credits of taught-course elements and a project that is worth 60 credits and culminates in a written dissertation.

Assessment

The award of the MSc is based on satisfactory performance in examinations, continuous assessment and research dissertation.

Accreditation

The programme is accredited by the Department of Health.

Careers

The MSc provides the main route for the professional qualification of Clinical Scientist in Medical Physics.

Additionally, the need for specific expertise in the use of medical radiation is enshrined in law. The Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations (IRMER) 2000 defines the role of Medical Physics Expert, required within any clinical context where radiation is being administered, either a diagnostic or therapeutic.

Facilities

The close proximity of Swansea University to Singleton Hospital, belonging to one of the largest health providers in Wales, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University (ABMU) health board, as well as the Velindre NHS Trust, a strongly academic cancer treatment centre, provide access to modern equipment, and the highest quality teaching and research.

The Institute of Life Science (ILS) Clinical Imaging Suite has recently been completed and overlaps the University and Singleton Hospital campuses. It features adjoined 3T MRI and high-resolution CT imaging. ILS has clinical research of social importance as a focus, through links with NHS and industrial partners.

Research

Swansea University offers a vibrant environment in medically-oriented research. The Colleges of Medicine has strong research links with the NHS, spearheaded by several recent multimillion pound developments, including the Institute of Life Science (ILS) and the Centre for NanoHealth (CNH).

The University provides high-quality support for MSc student research projects. Students in turn make valuable progress in their project area, which has led to publications in the international literature or has instigated further research, including the continuation of research at the doctoral level.
The College of Medicine provides an important focus in clinical research and we have the experience of interacting with medical academics and industry in placing students in a wide variety of research projects.

Medical academics have instigated projects examining and developing bioeffect planning tools for intensity modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy and devices for improving safety in radiotherapy. Industry partners have utilised students in the evaluation of the safety of ventricular-assist devices, intense-pulsed-light epilators and in the development of novel MRI spectroscopic methods. The student join teams that are solving research problems at the cutting-edge of medical science.