Race Equality Charter Mark

Race Equality Charter Mark

null

Swansea University will be taking part in the Race Equality Charter for the first time in 2016. 

Run by the Equality Challenge Unit, the Race Equality Charter is committed to improving the representation, progression and success of minority ethnic staff and students within higher education.  The charter aims to inspire a strategic approach to making cultural and systemic changes that will make a real different to minority ethnic staff and students.

The Race Equality Charter provides a framework through which institutions work to identify and self-reflect on institutional and cultural barriers standing in the way of minority ethnic staff and students. Member institutions develop initiatives and solutions for action, and can apply for a Bronze or Silver REC award, depending on their level of progress. ECU began developing the charter in 2012 following the impact Athena SWAN has had in gender equality. 

REC covers:

  • professional and support staff
  • academic staff
  • student progression and attainment
  • diversity of the curriculum

Swansea University's REC submission is led by Prof. Farah Bhatti, with support from the Equality Team and PVC Professor Iwan Davies.

 

Race Equality Charter Self-Assessment Team

The Self-Assessment Team (SAT) is chaired by senior pro-vice Chancellor Professor Iwan Davies. The SAT is responsible for writing the University submission and will monitor progress against the action plan. The group consists of members of Human Resources, the Equality team, and representatives from across the university.

If you would like to get involved, please get in touch at equalopportunities@swansea.ac.uk

REC Principles

The Race Equality Charter is underpinned by five fundamental guiding principles:

  1. Racial inequalities are a significant issue within higher education. Racial inequalities are not necessarily overt, isolated incidents. Racism is an everyday facet of UK society and racial inequalities manifest themselves in everyday situations, processes and behaviours.

  2. UK higher education cannot reach its full potential unless it can benefit from the talents of the whole population and until individuals from all ethnic backgrounds can benefit equally from the opportunities it affords.

  3. In developing solutions to racial inequalities, it is important that they are aimed at achieving long-term institutional culture change, avoiding a deficit model where solutions are aimed at changing the individual.

  4. Minority ethnic staff and students are not a homogenous group. People from different ethnic backgrounds have different experiences of and outcomes from/within higher education, and that complexity needs to be considered in analysing data and developing actions.

  5. All individuals have multiple identities, and the intersection of those different identities should be considered wherever possible.

As a member of ECU’s Race Equality Charter, Swansea University is committed to following these principles in how we approach race equality and address our institutional culture.