Mérin Broudic

Mérin Broudic

My work considers the environmental impact of marine energy devices, in particular underwater acoustics. The effect of installation, operation and decommissioning noise on the marine wildlife is not yet fully understood.

The environmental team is able to record, process, analyse and characterise underwater noise in high tidal flow environments using drifting buoys. This acoustic data is also used for passive acoustic monitoring of marine mammals. Analysing their distribution and behaviour underwater at tidal stream sites, the acoustic team also investigates the risk of collision between marine mammals and marine renewable energy devices.

Antonia Chatzirodou

Antonia Chatzirodou

I am a PhD student working on impacts of wave energy extraction on sea bed morphology. I will be using state of the art coastal model DELFT3D to investigate morphodynamic impacts of wave energy generation.

Previously to this, I graduated from the Faculty of Civil Engineering of the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) in 2010 and I completed my Master of Science in Water Resources Management and Technology, held by the department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering of the same Faculty, in 2011-2012.

During my studies, I participated in a Fundamental Research Program (2010-2011), held by the NTUA, related with the development of a numerical model (calibration and validation) based on Boussinesq equations, in order to investigate whether certain advances in numerical methods can describe the phenomenon of wave transformation due to flushing culverts in coastal structures. I have also gained experience working as a transport engineer in various projects in Greece (2008-2009), such as Research Origin and Destination and Related Traffic Composition Measurements in trucks at the Alternative Way of Attica Road in Athens, followed by data computerization, development of databases, geocoding and data elaboration.

Nick Croft

Dr Nick Croft

The main aim of my research has been to develop efficient and accurate techniques for the solution of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) problems in real life geometries. The approach taken has been to extend the Finite Volume approach (FV), which offers a highly efficient solution procedure on Cartesian meshes, to handle the unstructured meshes required to represent the geometries present in engineering applications. The resulting software has been used in a wide range of application areas but has been primarily employed to simulate processes within metals processing industries. These processes require the solution of not only CFD but also may involve structural deformation, electro-magnetic effects, particulate phases, chemical reactions and radiation effects all of which have been resolved in a single software framework.

Dr. Pushpa Dissanayake

Dr. Pushpa Dissanayake

I started my career as a numerical modeller in Sri Lanka (1999) and progressed with the MIKE21 modules investigating hydrodynamics and sediment transport in different coastal systems of local and international projects. I exposed to the Delft (the Netherlands) based Coastal Numerical Models (Delft3D, UNIBEST, SWAN, XBeach) during the time of my Master research in WL|Delft Hydraulics (Deltares). Later, in the PhD research (UNESCO-IHE/Delft University of Technology), applications of these models to understand the governing physical processes of coastal areas were extended beyond the horizon of their factory settings. I have published more than 20 research papers.  

Before joining Swansea University, I worked in Germany to implement climate change adaptation strategies of the local coastal areas. My present research (2013 - 2016) investigates morphological evolution and potential flooding of beach/dune systems of the Liverpool Bay under extreme weather events.   

Dr Matt Edmonds

Dr Matt Edmunds

My background consists of 13 years industrial experience in the automotive industry, project engineering heat exchange and exhaust products. I studied a Ph.D. in flow visualisation which led to an opportunity within the Marine Energy Research Group.

My area of expertise include; development of CFD models for studying aspects of marine turbines, development of advanced flow visualisation techniques, and modern programming techniques including mathematical and graphical methods.

I am currently in development of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model for studying marine turbine design and inter turbine array interaction in tidal marine environments. The model defines the interaction between the turbine blades and fluid using Blade Element Momentum (BEM) combined with CFD. This is used to simulate the time averaged wakes for differing array configurations. The goal of this work is to; understand the optimum layout of turbine arrays, evaluate the environmental effects, and to provide a set of modelling techniques more accessible to the engineer from a computational point of view. My research will support the design engineer in understanding and determining optimum turbine design, and the effects of inter turbine array configurations.

Dr Iain Fairley

Dr Iain Fairley

I have recently completed a PhD on beach morphodynamics behind detached breakwaters using a combination of measured data and numerical modelling.  Measurements were taken directly using GPS and remotely-sensed using time-averaged video images. Beach changes were related to measured wave and hydro-dynamic parameters using empirical orthogonal function analysis. Modelling was conducted using MIKE21, a state-of-the-art coastal modelling system that can predict waves, hydrodynamics and sediment transport.  I have also previously conducted research on artificial surfing reefs using physical modelling in a 2-D flume.

I am currently conducting research to inform marine renewable site selection along the Welsh coast. This involves wave-modelling using SWAN, hydrodynamic modelling of tidal stream turbine sites and investigating the impact of marine devices on waves, hydrodynamics and sediments. The spatial scale of this work varies between regional and site-specific.  Conclusions will be fed to stakeholders, industry and government to facilitate the growth of this emerging energy sector.

Dr Jose Horrillo-Carraballo

Dr Jose M. Horrillo-Caraballo

I have over 20 years professional experience in modelling coastal and estuarine environments with particular emphasis on sediment transport, water quality, morphodynamics and impacts of climate change on the coast.

I am a Research Officer in the College of Engineering at Swansea University working on the iCOASST project (funded by NERC). Also I have been involved in different projects as a Research Fellow at the University of Plymouth after I finished my PhD in the School of Civil Engineering at the University of Nottingham, UK. I worked for more than 8 years in the University of Cartagena (Colombia) as a lecturer in Fluids Mechanics & Labs and as a project manager in several coastal projects with the Hydraulic and Environmental Institute of the University of Cartagena. I was also lecturer of Port Structures in the Naval Engineering Faculty and in the Oceanography Faculty (National Army, Colombia) for more than three years.

I have published over 50 papers in peer-reviewed journals and international conferences on subjects including the assessment of flood risks, long-term coastal evolution and numerical modelling of environmental processes.

Current research areas include: forecasting long term coastal and estuarine morphodynamics; the reliability of flood defences; statistical analysis of coastal morphology; stochastic modelling of beach systems.

Dr Harshinie Karunarathna

Dr Harshinie Karunarathna

I have over 10 years experience  in modelling coastal and estuarine environment with particular emphasis on sediment transport, morphodynamics and impacts of climate change on the coastal environment. My research combines mathematical modelling of multi-scale coastal processes with behaviour-oriented geomorphological knowledge of coastal and estuarine systems. My current research includes predicting impacts of marine renewables on sea bed morphology; predicting long term coastal and estuarine morphodynamics; coastal flood modelling; investigating impacts of extreme weathers on coastal morphology.

Dr Ian Masters

Dr Ian Masters

Founder of the Marine Energy Research Group and Senior Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering, Swansea University. Chartered Mathematician and author of 74 academic papers. Member of the £50m Low Carbon Research Institute. Research areas include: Tidal turbines with combined tide, wave and turbulent flows; CFD modelling of arrays, wakes, scour and deposition; environmental impact analysis. Member of the BSI PEL/114 marine energy standards committee. Previously Director, Swanturbines Ltd., a tidal stream renewable energy company.

Dr Dimitrios Pletsas

Dr Dimitrios Pletsas

I am a collaborative projects officer for the Marine Energy Research Group, College of Engineering. A PRINCE2 Registered Practitioner [P2R/927168] with a BSc in chemistry and PhD in medicinal chemistry I have spent over 10 years working on drug discovery and development at the interface of academia and industry leading research projects from the bench to the clinic. 

Professor Dominic Reeve

Professor Dominic Reeve

CMath, FIMA, FICE

I have over 20 years professional experience of both research and consultancy in the marine environment including: underwater acoustic propagation; tidal flow; surface wave propagation; sediment transport; ecological systems; risk assessment. I have published over 150 academic papers and am the author of three text books on: Coastal Engineering; Risk & Reliability; and Hydraulic Modelling. Current research areas include: forecasting long term coastal and estuarine morphodynamics; the reliability of flood defences; statistical analysis of coastal morphology; stochastic modelling of beach systems.

Dr Michael Togneri

Dr Michael Togneri

I started my academic career as an engineer, shifted sideways into mathematics for my postgraduate studies and have come back to engineering here at Swansea.  My work is based on an extended blade element momentum theory (BEMT) model of tidal turbines developed by Dr Ian Masters and collaborators.  This is a tool that allows rapid modelling for much quicker evaluation of turbine performance under a range of operating conditions than is possible with full Navier-Stokes simulations.  I am developing further extensions to this model in order to broaden the cases it is capable of simulating, looking particularly at turbulent flow conditions and, in the future, at along-blade flow.

Antonios Valsamidis

Antonios Valsamidis

My PhD research focuses on the impacts of marine constructions on beaches and especially the erosion phenomenon. I develop mathematical, numerical and statistical models to simulate the existing hydrodynamic conditions for a given field site and predict future cross-shore and long-shore beach evolution. My case-study is the beach of Borth in Wales where the performance of a newly constructed coastal defence scheme in the vicinity of a river-mouth is being investigated.

Previously to my PhD studies, I was working as a civil engineer in industry, gaining experience in designing and supervising the construction of hydraulic works. In addition, I participated in the INTERREG program: beachmed-e; (2006-2008) which aimed at monitoring the erosion problems on Mediterranean coasts. During this project, I used the GENESIS code to assess the long-term shoreline evolution in Northern Greece due to wave action, the presence of coastal works, and rivers’ sediment discharges.

Dr Alison Williams

Dr Alison Williams

I have over 10 years experience in modelling multiphysics processes with particular expertise in modelling processes involving complex flows. I have been involved in several industry led projects in the areas of wind turbines, metal processing, manufacture of electronics components and the development of ventilation systems.

I am currently involved in developing computational models to assess both the performance of marine energy devices and their interactions with the environment. I am also leading the LCRI Marine workpackage on early stage design and testing which involves working with a range of SME's in Wales to assess the feasibility of their devices and ideas for marine renewable energy.

Dr Yunqing Xuan

Dr Yunqing Xuan

I have more than 15 years research and industry experiences in flood risk management and climate change impact and adaption. My research focuses on hydrological and hydro-meteorological modelling of extreme events, weather radar and radar-hydrology, hydroinformatics, climate change and data downscaling.   I have been involved in and have led a number of key national and multi-national research projects of the fields, including EPSRC FRMRC I & II, EU FP5 FLOODRELIEF, EU FP6 FLOODSite.  Presently, I am leading a Knowledge Transfer Partnership working together with TSB, WG and Fujitsu Laboratories Europe to implement a high-resolution, HPC based hydro-meteorological modelling system to support Welsh Extreme Weather Initiative.

Enayatollah Zangiabadi

Enayatollah Zangiabadi

First degree in Mechanical Engineering from Kerman Azad University, Iran and MSc from Swansea University. MSc dissertation with the Marine Energy Research Group titled “An Investigation of Effects of Turbulence in High Energy Tidal streams”. My PhD topic is the modelling of flows in real coastal tidal environments using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The aim of the work is to create a full model with the capability of covering all aspects of a natural turbulent flow and to apply this to test cases around the coast of Wales.

The other part of my project is modelling of the interaction of fish and marine mammals with pressure changes experienced in high flow rate tidal streams. One of the important issues is the pressure change that the Species experiences which could damage the internal organs of the fish. This pressure change and the survival rate of the fish are investigated in various scenarios, using different turbulence models and approaches.