Swansea.

Where bright futures begin...

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Student Life in Swansea.

Swansea University wouldn't be anything without its excellent, diverse student base, and for this reason we're dedicated to supporting you in every way possible. Led by our Students' Union, you'll have access to great shops and restaurants, fantastic events throughout the year, as well as a cavalcade of brilliant societies!

Learning in Swansea.

University isn't for just learning your trade - it's for learning where you fit in the world as a whole. With world-class facilities at your disposal, as well as plenty of opportunities to get involved in something new, our campus could truly maximise your potential.

Living Here in Swansea.

University is not just for learning - it's for living! At Swansea's coastal campus, we give you the freedom to discover what makes you happy from day one. Our picturesque location is nestled between famous towns, national parks and award-winning beaches, offering something for everyone. Why not explore it for yourself?

Graduate Prospects in Swansea.

Here at Swansea, we're proud to combine excellent teaching with a number of ways to challenge our students, putting them head and shoulders above the competition. We offer a wide variety of working placements, popular Careers Fairs, strong links with national and global businesses, and even the top-quality career development support provided by Swansea Employability Academy. We have everything in place to ensure you get far in life, whatever you want to do!

Swansea University. Where bright futures begin

Picking the right university for your chosen degree is one of the most difficult decisions you'll make in your life. However, here at Swansea University, we don't think we're good for all students - we know we are. With excellent courses, a jaw-dropping coastal campus and fun, popular student facilities and events throughout the year, your decision may just get a little easier. Let us explain what we can do for you and your future…

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Living in
Swansea
by Ian Morgan   American Studies and Politics
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Student life
in Swansea
By Gareth Taylor   BA Geography, Level 2
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Learning in Swansea by Rhiannon Davies   LLB Law Hons
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Matt Whorwood
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Martin Spray
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Professor Lyn Evans
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Kylie Hearne
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David Cornthwaite
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Nia Bryer
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Sharon Bishop
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Renee Godfry
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  • Undergraduate Admissions
  • Swansea University
  • Singleton Park
  • Swansea
  • SA2 8PP
  • T: +44(0)1792 295111
  • E: admissions@swansea.ac.uk
  • Students' Union
  • Swansea University
  • Union House
  • Singleton Park
  • Swansea
  • SA2 8PP
  • T: +44(0)1792 295 466
  • E: info@swansea-union.co.uk
Swansea University is a registered charity. No. 1138342.
Ian Morgan
Living in Swansea My story by Ian Morgan
  1. What made you choose Swansea?

    Swansea as a University gave me a good feeling right from the Open Day, to start, it is a campus university, it felt like one big community, and when I got there this sure confirmed to me that this was true. Not only that, Swansea University also allows you in a lot of subjects, including mine, direct your own degree, so I get to choose the areas that I want to study in my degree, especially at the times of where it counts. Not only that, it's right on the beach, with some spectacular views, what more could you ask for.

  2. What was the best thing about studying your degree?

    My degree programme, gives me a bit of everything, it gives me the opportunity to research into a topic that I want to write about, the politics half allows me to explore philosophy, structure as well as individual country politics, American Studies on the other hand gives me first-hand knowledge of politics, history, literature, culture, sociology etc. on all things American, it's quite interesting to study a country which has a very short history in comparison to the UK.

  3. What was the best thing about studying at Swansea?

    The teaching, the lecturers make your experience so interesting, whether you want to know more on a topic or you need that little extra support on areas that you find difficult they are there to make sure you are on the path you need to be.

  4. Did you join any societies? If so, did you enjoy them?

    Yes, in my first year, I was a very active member of the LGBT and Spanish Societies. Societies have changed my life, they have provided me with friends for life, people that I know that well after University are going to be an integral part of my life. More than this, societies provide you with many opportunities to gain valuable skills for future employment, in my second year I was the President of the LGBT society, allowing me to develop my leadership, confidence, oratory, organisation skills, and lead a society that became award winning at the end of the year. Also, you have memories that you will never forget.

  5. What's your best memory of Swansea?

    The moment where I sat to take a photo with my LGBT committee with trophies, certificates and chocolates, to celebrate the difference that we made to a society in the University, one that actually can directly impact those students around you.

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Top Tips

for living in Swansea
  • Come to an Open Day: Open Days are a great opportunity for students to get a feel for the University, and by taking part in the whole day gives you a little taster of what you could be experiencing come September.
  • Explore the courses at the University: Sometimes, you may want to do two subjects, or find it difficult to choose between two subjects, there are so many combination (joint honours) programmes at the University that you may get the chance to do them both.
  • Don't be afraid to ask: You will never know the answer until you ask the question, ask all the questions before hand, because being a student at Swansea, I am confident you will find the right one.
Rhiannon Davis
Student Life in Swansea My story by Rhiannon Davies
  1. What was your degree?

    My degree is LLB Law Hons.

  2. What was the best thing about studying your Law degree?

    The best thing about studying my degree this year was the EU module and Tort because they were so interesting and some of the cases were hilarious

  3. What was the best thing about studying at Swansea?

    The best thing about studying at Swansea is the atmosphere, everybody was really friendly and the lecturers were knowledgeable and helpful.

  4. Did you manage to find new friends easily?

    It was very easy to find new friends as I lived in the student village and everyone was friendly and sociable. I also made friends through my seminar group.

  5. Did you join any societies? If so, did you enjoy them?

    I did join some societies but I didn't end up going to any events as I was always doing other things. I did want to join the equestrian club but it was expensive to join and then an additional cost per lesson and I found that I wouldn't be able to afford it.

  6. How has Swansea prepared you for your future career?

    Swansea has prepared me well for my future career as not only has it made me act more professionally and has opened my eyes to be more realistic about my prospects and that if I want something I have to work exceptionally hard.

  7. What's your best memory of Swansea?

    My best memory of Swansea so far is the social atmosphere and the knowledge that I've made friends that I know I will have for a long time.

  8. What's your advice for prospective students looking to come to Swansea?

    My advice to anyone looking to study in Swansea would be to;

    • Really inform yourself of your prospective course to ensure you know you will like it
    • Join societies as you will make loads of friends
    • Really think about what surroundings you want to live in, as the village is great but can be a bit wild but the campus can be a bit clique-y but I have been told quite quiet and also great if you don't like getting out of bed early in the morning!
    • Go out on a Monday or Wednesday, they're the best nights
    • Revise thoroughly for exams because they really will help
    • If you're lucky enough to get any bursaries they really do help and if you need any information on them go to the Swansea website and really try for them. The excellence bursary and income bursary really helped me
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Top Tips

for living in Swansea
  • Go out on a Monday or Wednesday, they're the best nights
  • If you're lucky enough to get any bursaries they really do help and if you need any information on them go to the Swansea website and really try for them. The excellence bursary and income bursary really helped me
  • Really inform yourself of your prospective course to ensure you know you will like it
  • Really think about what surroundings you want to live in, as the village is great but can be a bit wild but the campus can be a bit clique-y but I have been told quite quiet and also great if you don't like getting out of bed early in the morning!
Professon Lyn Evans
Graduate Prospects in Swansea My story by Professor Lyn Evans

Professor Lyn Evans CBE FRS is the project leader at CERN, previously having worked on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and now working on the International Linear Collider (ILC). He received a first class degree in Physics before gaining his PhD. He was made Honorary Fellow of the University in 2002.

  1. What is your role at CERN?

    The Large Hadron Collider project is finished now, so I don't do that anymore, but of course it was a very long project, it took 16 years to put it all together. Now I'm working on what maybe the next big project, which is the International Linear Collider, which may be built at CERN, maybe not. It may be somewhere else in the world, including Japan, so that's what I'm doing today.

  2. It's been a year since the discovery of a particle with the same signature as the Higgs Boson, where are you in uncovering this mystery?

    We have found out that it is the Higgs boson, or a Higgs boson. At the moment the LHC is shut down for a long maintenance before we take it out to higher energy, and then we would be looking at investigating the properties of the Higgs boson within the constraints of what the LHC can do. And also looking for, obviously, a manifestation of the Higgs, we want to try to understand what the dark matter, energy in our universe is. The ILC, the linear collider, will actually follow the LHC, if you like, which is very good for discovering but not very good for precise measurements. The ILC will follow up and match the properties of the Higgs with a very high precision.

  3. Your initial interest was in chemistry, not physics. Is that correct?

    Yeah it was – I went to Swansea to initially do chemistry. The chemistry department was very strong there.

  4. So what made you switch to physics?

    Well, in my first year in university I did both, obviously, and then I just found that my interest was more in physics than in chemistry, so I decided to change. I think I was, quite frankly, probably attracted to chemistry by a very inspiring chemistry teacher at school. But when I went to Swansea University then it became very quickly obvious to me that I wanted to study mathematics and physics.

  5. What really captures your imagination about physics, as opposed to chemistry?

    Well, everything. It is, after all, the most fundamental science. And especially the kind of stuff we do here, looking into the very basic building blocks of our world. So I think for me physics has always, ever since I was in university, physics has been my number one.

  6. What do you remember your experiences being like at Swansea University and Swansea itself?

    Well, I was an undergraduate in Swansea between '63 and '66 and then I did a PhD there from '67 to '69, so I spent six years there. They were a tremendous six years – it's a great environment to be in. The university is in a beautiful setting and there is a fantastic student life.

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Story Image
Graduate Prospects in Swansea My story by Martin Spray

It seems so long ago since my days at Swansea University but with longstanding and treasured friends I still look back with very fond memories and still visit the city and fabulous Gower coast as often as I can. Leaving my home in Surrey for the then far flung corner of South Wales was rather daunting and yet it turned out to be a wonderful and formative time of my life.

  1. Why did you decide to study at Swansea University?

    I was originally interested in marine biology and had come to Swansea on two previous field study sessions with my school in Kingston upon Thames. I therefore knew the Gower and the reputation of the University. It came down to a choice between Newcastle and Swansea, both attractive, but I picked the right one.

  2. What did you enjoy most about the course?

    The department lecturers were a great set of individuals headed by Professor Knight Jones. They were both interesting and very approachable.

  3. What are you doing now?

    I am chief executive of the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust (WWT), an organisation with a great history and established by one of most influential conservationists of his time, Sir Peter Scott (son of the Antarctic explorer). The charity manages nine wetland centres in the UK, attracting around 1 million visitors each year. WWT now has 220,000 members and was a pioneer in environmental education, now receiving some 60,000 school visits each year. It has a growing international programme of wetland conservation, and become a leading organisation in this field worldwide. My career has been quite diverse, including positions at the Science & Engineering Research Council, HM Treasury, the World Wide Fund for Nature and the Wildlife Trusts. Looking back at my career, it certainly wasn’t designed in any way. I am a great believer in taking the opportunities that present themselves. I never dreamt that I would be where I am now.

  4. How has Swansea University and your course helped you with your career?

    I think, like my school days, it is the life experience that is the most influential in the long run. At Swansea I was able to meet people from all parts of the country and the world with different interests and aspirations. It broadened my thinking enormously.

  5. What’s it like running a conservation charity?

    Balancing the passion and ambitions of a highly talented and specialist team of conservation scientists with the need for the organisation to operate as a business, albeit not for profit, has its many challenges. But it is also incredibly rewarding with the people you meet, the places you get to see, and the variety of situations you get to experience. No day is the same and boredom is not an option. Wetlands not only support a vast proportion of the world’s species but also provide livelihoods for many communities and so the future potential is enormous.

  6. What advice do you have for current students and new graduates?

    First, for new graduates, enjoy the experience and make the most of your time there. It is a one-off opportunity. For new graduates, don’t be too fixed in your ideas of the path ahead. New opportunities and decisions will face you and sometimes the path ahead will change.

  7. Congratulations on your CBE for services to nature conservation. How did it feel to hear the news?

    It was an overwhelming surprise but also a very great honour. I didn’t think I would ever work in this field let alone be recognised in such a way. To follow in the footsteps of Sir Peter Scott is also a huge honour.

  8. What are your memories of Swansea?

    I had an amazing 4 years at the University. The campus, Clyne Castle, Rhossili Bay and Three Cliffs Bay are just a few of my fond memories but the most memorable and valuable of all were the people I met and the longstanding friendships I made while I was there. I wouldn’t have missed it for the world.

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Top Tips

for living in Swansea
  • Leaving my home in Surrey for the then far flung corner of South Wales was rather daunting and yet it turned out to be a wonderful and formative time of my life.
  • At Swansea I was able to meet people from all parts of the country and the world with different interests and aspirations. It broadened my thinking enormously.
  • For new graduates, don’t be too fixed in your ideas of the path ahead. New opportunities and decisions will face you and sometimes the path ahead will change.
Story Image
Graduate Prospects in Swansea My story by Kylie Hearne

Kylie Hearne is an entrepreneur and owner of Stardust Boutique. She studies Classical Civilisation (BA). Kylie is the recent winner of the Princes Trust Young Ambassador of the Year award and has met with the Prime Minister to speak about youth unemployment and entrepreneurship.

  1. Tell us a bit about yourself

    I'm 27 at the minute and I grew up in a small village on a council estate. After doing my A-levels I decided to study classical civilisation at Swansea University.

  2. What drew you to the course?

    I just love the subject; I think it's really interesting; I think it gives you a lot of key skills, like analytical skills. I just love literature really, like Greek stories, Greek myths, prose and poetry.

  3. What was your favourite thing about the course?

    The module on Greek romance novels was my favourite because I could kind of see things in it that you could relate to today. I did my dissertation based on one of the Greek romance novels.

  4. Can you tell us about Stardust Boutique?

    I decided to call the business I was starting on the side Stardust Boutique because all the dresses I was renting out were sparkly dresses and I thought they were like stardust. I decided to work from the house and I'd been working extremely hard until four in the morning, because obviously I wanted to make some money. After six months I'd achieved a £50,000 turnover just from my bedroom alone. I realised I needed a premises because I had so much stock and people were asking whether they could come and try them on in my house, which was starting to interfere with my home life. I looked for a premises in September 2011, found one and in February 2012 I opened the shop.

  5. How did Swansea University equip you to go out and open a business?

    I think the key skills that I gained and the life experiences of university are what prepared me. I think you can apply any of the skills you learn from being in university to a job, any job. Classical civilisation is one where the skills are lying beneath the surface – they're analytical. It gives you people skills as well, allowing you to understand other people's context and cultures.

  6. What is the thing that you have been most proud of?

    There are two things: one is actually graduating, because it took me so long and it was very hard for me because I had phenomenal background problems; and the second thing is starting my own business. It was the day that the shop opened that I realised that it's such an achievement – I've come so far with no money.

  7. Have you got a favourite Swansea memory?

    I had a really, really good lecturer: John Morgan, who I found very inspirational. There was one lecturer in particular that I remember. It was on Armistice Day and he actually brought in a poem from a World War One soldier that he'd related back to Horace, the Roman poet. That was my favourite lecture because I just found it so meaningful. He's such a talented lecturer and when I think of Swansea University I think of that lecture because it meant so much to me.

  8. What advice would you give to prospective students who might be thinking about applying to Swansea?

    For one, there's a beach right next to the university, and a park. It's a lovely university and you will definitely gain a lot from going there. You should definitely pick Swansea.

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Top Tips

for living in Swansea
  • The key skills that I gained and the life experiences of university prepared me for starting my own business.
  • Swansea is a lovely university and you will definitely gain a lot from going there. You should definitely pick Swansea!
David-Cornthwaite
Graduate Prospects in Swansea My story by David Cornthwaite
  1. How did you get into adventuring?

    I guess the first step was that I found myself in a rut. The job I had as a graphic designer wasn't fulfilling me. I'd been seduced by the whims of Western Society, wanting a mortgage and money. I woke up on my 25th birthday and decided things weren't going to change themselves, so I needed to make a change.

    I still had a mortgage to pay and had to work, but I wanted to pursue new avenues – then along came the skateboard. I loved snowboarding, but being in Wales there's not much snow, so I got myself a skateboard to relive the feeling of snowboarding.

    I quit my job and decided to go skateboarding. I went from John o' Groats to Land's End as a warm up before skating from Perth to Brisbane, which was the longest skateboard journey ever! After that I got my first book deal and here I am now.

  2. Tell us about Expedition1000

    The Idea came about because I went on this big skateboarding journey. Expedition 1000 was really to keep focus- it's 28 different journeys of a minimum of 1000 miles on vehicles without a motor. Every journey is completely unique and the point is to raise £1m for charity through this and my books and public speaking. It's also about inspiring people to go on their own adventures.

  3. You recently travelled across Europe on an EliptiGO?

    Yeah, I went from Liverpool to Nice on an EliptiGo. They're like bikes that imitate aspects of running without the impact of running. You have the ability to take it slow, get fit and meet new people.

  4. What about your experience at Swansea?

    I loved being in Swansea. It’s a beautiful location, it was lovely having a campus so close to the beach – the air was fresh and as a result the people were happier.

    I edited Waterfront, the student publication, for two years and I think that gave me good grounding for what I do now. My experiences with Waterfront were definitely formative for the writing I do now.

  5. Tell us a bit about the Blue Project

    The Blue Project, which I don’t work with much anymore, was set up to try and get people to join me. It was like "You guys come and join me for a day and see if you like it." I get people saying 'I wish I could do what you do," and I say "You can!". It's really to inspire people to get up off the sofa and get out.

  6. What have you got in store for your next adventure?

    I don't know what the next adventure is, I don't plan them. They start off as a small seed and 'bang' – it's an adventure. My third book 'Life in the Slow Lane' is available in the Amazon Kindle Store right now, and out in paperback in two weeks . The Kindle version jumped to the top of the adventuring section, beating Bear Grylls for a short time, which I never thought would happen.

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Top Tips

for living in Swansea
  • I loved being in Swansea. It’s a beautiful location, it was lovely having a campus so close to the beach – the air was fresh and as a result the people were happier.
  • I edited Waterfront, the student publication, for two years and I think that gave me good grounding for what I do now. My experiences with Waterfront were definitely formative for the writing I do now.
Nia Bryer
Graduate Prospects in Swansea My story by Nia Bryer
  1. Why did you decide to study at Swansea University?

    The Department of Geography had an excellent reputation and I wanted to concentrate upon human, social and economic geography, which were well covered by the department.

  2. What did you enjoy most about your course at Swansea?

    Lectures were delivered by professional academics who were well-researched in their specialist fields.

  3. What are you doing now career-wise?

    I am currently a Director of a small research and evaluation company, Old Bell 3 Ltd. We have offices in Llandeilo and Ludlow and employ six consultants. Old Bell 3 provides research, evaluation and advisory services to public, private and voluntary sector organisations working mainly within Wales. Since 2000, the company has built an extensive track record of carrying out major research, evaluation and advisory commissions for Welsh, UK and European clients. We have experience across a wide range of policy areas including learning, skills and employment, economic development, community regeneration, social and financial inclusion, business support, social enterprise, ICT, equalities and the Welsh language. Our client list includes various Welsh Government Departments, the BIG Lottery Fund in Wales, local authorities, the Welsh Local Government Association (WLGA), Higher Education Funding Council for Wales (HEFCW), the Wales Council for Voluntary Action (WCVA), the Wales Co-operative Centre, and various local authorities, Universities and Sector Skills Councils.

  4. How has Swansea University and your course helped you with your chosen career path?

    The course at Swansea University provided me with a thorough grounding in research methodologies which I apply on a daily basis at Old Bell 3. In particular my studies covered both qualitative research methods such as those applied in my dissertation, as well as quantitative research methods. Furthermore the course fuelled my interest across a range of policy areas such as economic development, rural geography, social justice and industry.

  5. What are the most challenging parts of your job?

    Ensuring that contracts are delivered to the highest possible standards, are based on rigorous research methods, and are completed within often very tight timescales and budgets.

  6. And the most rewarding parts of the job?

    The key reward is witnessing the growth and success of a small business, particularly within the current economic climate. Secondly, the vast majority of our research and evaluation contracts require the preparation of reports which provide detailed feedback on the findings of our fieldwork. These reports usually contain a set of recommendations for the client to consider and implement. It is always rewarding to see such recommendations being put into practice.

  7. What was the best careers advice you were given?

    I’ve heard several words of wisdom along the way: You’ve got to create your own opportunities in this world rather than respond to what others are offering. On graduating my father told me to contact organisations I’d like to work for asking for work experience just to get my foot in the door rather than wait for jobs to be advertised. Concentrate on what you can do, rather than what you can’t. This was my husband’s advice to me when I considered applying for a job which I thought was too ambitious at the time – but got it!

  8. What advice do you have for current students and new graduates?

    When you apply for a job make sure your application is correct and has no spelling or grammatical errors. I can’t overemphasise the importance of this – as an employer, mistakes reflect badly upon the applicant and it demonstrates a lack of basic skills and attention to detail. Also any potential employer can easily do some further research on applicants via social media,so make sure that the image you portray is positive and professional.

  9. What are your plans for the future?

    Continue to develop Old Bell 3, concentrating on providing excellent quality services for our clients and maintaining a good work-life balance.

  10. What are you most proud of?

    Raising two wonderful children

  11. What are your favourite memories of your university years at Swansea?

    Getting to know people from all walks of life. The Welsh Society and the Mumbles Mile!

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Top Tips

for living in Swansea
  • You’ve got to create your own opportunities in this world rather than respond to what others are offering.
  • Concentrate on what you can do, rather than what you can’t. This was my husband’s advice to me when I considered applying for a job which I thought was too ambitious at the time – but got it!
  • When you apply for a job make sure your application is correct and has no spelling or grammatical errors. I can’t overemphasise the importance of this – as an employer, mistakes reflect badly upon the applicant and it demonstrates a lack of basic skills and attention to detail.
Sharon Bishop
Graduate Prospects in Swansea My story by Sharon Bishop
  1. Why did you decide to study at Swansea University?

    It was a combination of factors – Swansea was one of the best places in the country to study this course, and it’s also where my Dad was from and I had family there, so I’ve always known and loved the area. The fantastic beach location was a big plus too!

  2. What did you enjoy most about your course at Swansea?

    The combination of study and practical work – you get to use both your brain and your hands.

  3. What are you doing now career-wise?

    I'm director of the Times Cheltenham Science Festival, one of four festivals organised by a charity called Cheltenham Festivals (the others are jazz, classical music and literature). The Science Festival happens over six days in June. This year we issued 39,000 tickets for talks, debates, shows, comedy, exhibitions, an extensive schools programme and much more. I also oversee a competition called FameLab, which aims to discover and develop scientists and engineers who have a talent for communicating their research with the public. We started the competition in the UK in 2005, and now it runs in 18 other countries around the world.

  4. How has Swansea University and your course helped you with your chosen career path?

    The course gave me an understanding of how science works and how universities work, which is vitally important to my current role because I work closely with a lot of researchers and research funders. It also gave me a passion for engineering that I have never lost, and I love being able to share that with thousands of other people through the festival programme.

  5. What are the most challenging parts of your job?

    My working year revolves around six days in June, so there are some big pressure points with tight deadlines, long hours and lots of hard work. Fundraising is also a challenge – we have to raise large sums to make sure the festival can continue its charitable work and develop year on year, and that certainly has its challenges in the current economic climate.

  6. What are the most rewarding parts of your job?

    It’s a huge team effort and everyone is passionate about what they do, and I love working in such a dynamic environment. I also work with scientists and engineers who are at the frontline of research – everything from the neuroscience of mental illness to 3D printing technology – so I get to learn about the most amazing things and meet some fascinating people. It is the public response that is most rewarding though: speaking to a group of young men who came to an event about anorexia because they wanted to understand what their friend was going through; hearing from a girl who chose to study engineering because she was inspired by something she saw at the festival; hearing about an 8 year old boy who is no longer afraid of having an MRI scan because he had the chance to use one at the festival; the look on Robert Winston’s face when a child stumped him with a question; the smiles on people’s faces simply because they’re having a great time. The festival really makes a difference to people’s lives, and that’s why I do it.

  7. What was the best careers advice you were given?

    That a career is not necessarily for life! Some people know exactly what they want to do and have their career path mapped out. I didn’t, and I worried that I should. But these days it is rare to find a job for life – the main thing is to do something you enjoy and find rewarding.

  8. What advice do you have for current students and new graduates?

    Take every opportunity and get as much experience as you can. Seek out opportunities to do more of the things you find interesting and enjoy. Talk to people – find out what they do and tell them what you do and why you love it, because you never know who or what they know. Be passionate. Be curious.

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Top Tips

for living in Swansea
  • Take every opportunity and get as much experience as you can. Seek out opportunities to do more of the things you find interesting and enjoy. Talk to people – find out what they do and tell them what you do and why you love it, because you never know who or what they know. Be passionate. Be curious.
  • A career is not necessarily for life! Some people know exactly what they want to do and have their career path mapped out. I didn’t, and I worried that I should. But these days it is rare to find a job for life – the main thing is to do something you enjoy and find rewarding.
Gareth Taylor
Student Life in Swansea My story by Gareth Taylor

Gareth Taylor is a second year Geography student and a volunteer for the university's charity, Discovery, which helps communities at home and abroad.

  1. What made you choose Swansea?

    The course, the location, and the welcoming nature of the department staff.

  2. What was the best thing about studying your degree?

    I get to travel. I recently undertook field work in Vancouver, Canada.

  3. What was the best thing about studying at Swansea?

    The ease of access to resources and the support offered by staff.

  4. Did you manage to find new friends easily?

    Yes very, through the Welsh Society, and the football team, as well as housemates, and my course-mates.

  5. Did you join any societies? If so, did you enjoy them?

    I joined the Welsh Society, which was brilliant. I made a lot of friends through various activities and socials. I also joined a football team which is brilliant.

  6. How has Swansea prepared you for your future career?

    Yes, I feel as though whatever career I end up in, Swansea has equipped me with skills that will be beneficial.

  7. Can you tell us more about your voluntary work for Swansea's charity Discovery?

    I was part of a team that worked in Siavonga, Zambia for a month in the summer of 2012, and on my return I became Project Coordinator for a project called Glocal, which forms school links between schools in the Swansea area and in Siavonga. So far we've linked two schools - Waun Wen Primary with Bbakasa, and Pentre Hafod with Matua. I am also a Trustee for the charity.

  8. What's your best memory of Swansea?

    I have many! Two that stick out are playing in the Swansea Student Cup Final at St Helens in two consecutive years. We won the cup on both occasions and I had the honour of lifting the trophy as captain on the second occasion.

  9. What's your advice for prospective students looking to come to Swansea?

    Don't just look at the course. Look at what the university has to offer, because it has lots!

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Top Tips

for living in Swansea
  • Don't just look at the course. Look at what the university has to offer, because it has lots!
  • Whatever career I end up in, Swansea has equipped me with skills that will be beneficial.
Matt Whorwood
Living in Swansea My story by Matt Whorwood

Matt Whorwood is a recent Mechanical Engineering graduate, receiving First Class Honours. He is also a swimmer who participated in the London 2012 Paralympic games, taking a bronze medal in the 400m Freestyle Race as well as winning two bronzes at the 2008 Beijing Paralympics.

  1. What was your degree?

    It was bachelor of engineering, so BA in Mechanical Engineering. If it was full time it would be a three year course, but towards the back end I went part time to get a better balance between my university studies and sport. So I ended up doing it over five years.

  2. What was the best thing about studying Mechanical Engineering?

    Personally I find it very rewarding to have a problem and then come up with a solution. The subject and the syllabus at Swansea allows you to tackle so many different problems with a variety of methods.

  3. What was the best thing about studying at Swansea?

    I think the balance – I think Swansea is really good at giving you a great balance and a university experience. In my sport I was serious and had a lot of hours dedicated to it, but even students that aren't getting involved in activities, having the Wednesday afternoon off all the time is really rewarding and it's really good of the university to encourage people to have a good balance.

  4. Let's talk about your sporting career. What's your proudest moment swimming in Paralympic events?

    It was the London 2012 podium. Beijing was absolutely awesome –I was a little bit younger and it was my very first Paralympics. Everything was so exciting and on a grand scale, but London held a very special feeling because you could just sense that there were so many people behind you. It wasn't that it was pressure, any more that you put on yourself, but just having all those people in the stands and when you get on the podium they're all cheering – it's very humbling.

  5. What's your best memory of Swansea?

    On graduating, when they call out everyone's name I had a little bit of a pause when the person before me walked out and I looked to my right and I saw a handful of my lecturers and heads of year etc. So many of them had been so supportive of my sport/education balance; they had done so much for me and it was really nice that it had all paid off. I had formed so much respect for them and everything they've done for me I'll always be thankful for.

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Top Tips

for living in Swansea
  • Do it – don't apply anywhere else!
  • Get your teeth into the course.
  • Find a nice balance with being social, like on a Wednesday afternoon, because all work and no play won't make for a fun life.
Renee Godfrey
Living in Swansea My story by Renee Godfrey

Renee Godfrey is a BBC presenter and world champion surfer, who graduated from Swansea University with a degree in anthropology.

  1. What drew you to Swansea University?

    One of the biggest draws to Swansea was its location – a campus right on the water's edge in Swansea Bay. You've got the Gower Peninsula accessible for surfing and other outdoor activities. That was probably the first thing that drew me to it. I also liked the idea of a campus university; having everything in one place together so it feels more like a community rather than dispersed across the city.

  2. Did you take up surfing as a result of going to Swansea or were you already a keen surfer?

    I started a long time before I started at Swansea but certainly was able to surf nearly every day while I was a student here, which was an amazing thing to be able to do in your student life.

  3. What made you want to study anthropology?

    Anthropology just really fascinated me and I thought if I'm going to spend three years of my life doing something, I need to make sure it's something that I'm really interested in. The department had some really interesting members of staff who had done weird and wonderful things all over the world and I thought what better way to learn than to learn from people that I thought were quite cool and who had interesting stories to tell.

  4. Were there any specific parts of Swansea that you really enjoyed?

    I used to love spending time walking around the Mumbles, surfing around Langland bay but also going down to the Gower and surfing around Rhossili. Also snorkelling in the summer when it was warm enough and swimming in the sea. The 50m swimming pool is a big draw in Swansea, which is right next to the university.

  5. What is your favourite memory of being at Swansea University?

    The novelty for me with being at Swansea was studying hard and doing well academically, but going into lectures in the morning after having been surfing already before the day's begun. Then coming out of lectures and being able to go surfing again before going back into lectures and then surfing before it got dark. Being able to combine studying and my passion which is surfing was a luxury.

  6. After you graduated you went straight into freelance travel writing?

    That's right. I surfed in quite a few competitions for a couple of years after being at Swansea. Then I started working at the BBC using my anthropology degree from Swansea and all the journalistic background I had gained and started working on the Tribe series.

  7. Can you tell us about your presenting experiences?

    I was a researcher on Tribe before following a career with the BBC working on anthropological and wildlife series like Human Planet. At the end of Human Planet I presented a series for BBC Wales called Wales in Four Seasons. I spent a long time travelling all over the world and then it was a lot of fun and a great experience to come back to Wales and tell stories in Wales. We travelled through Wales looking at different wildlife and human stories; looking at how the seasons affect lives throughout the year.

  8. What is your proudest achievement to date?

    I'm really proud of Wales in Four Seasons and how well it did and how well it was received. It was well received not only by people who watched it but people who were in it as well. The characters we met along the way in the series, for me, made it special and that they were all so thrilled with the series and that it meant so much to them made me very proud.

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Top Tips

for living in Swansea
  • Get a bike! Go and explore, because it's just one of the most beautiful places and there are so many hidden coves and corners to the coastline. There's the country roads at the Gower which are perfect for bike riding.
  • Make sure that you have a waterproof jacket because it inevitably rains a lot but it's still just as beautiful when it’s raining or sunny.